Monitored Room Development and Implementation: The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in Maximizing Resources and Optimizing Patient Safety

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164146
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Monitored Room Development and Implementation: The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in Maximizing Resources and Optimizing Patient Safety
Author(s):
Miller, Harriet
Author Details:
Harriet Miller, MSN, ARNP, Shands Children's Hospital at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Shands Children's Hospital at the University of Florida is a hospital located within a hospital. It provides specialized care for complex cases in an academic medical center. Optimizing patient safety and maximizing resources were identified goals. Problem identification included: 1) the growing need to empty pediatric intensive care unit and intermediate care unit beds to accommodate the growing population of post-surgical and trauma patients, and 2) the need for a monitored area to care for patients who needed closer observation than the pediatric floor, but less than the intermediate care unit. Examples of such patients were those with a stable tracheostomy, and those requiring nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A multidisciplinary team comprised of nurses, managers and directors, respiratory therapists, the pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), and physicians met to develop guidelines for the Monitored Room. Admission criteria, orders, and the frequency of assessments and interventions were developed. The CNS worked closely with the staff in designing the nurse training and development which included modular, video, and hands on aspects. The nurses from the pediatric floor cross-trained with the staff of the intensive care unit in working with patients who would meet the admission specifications. Minor modifications to a pre-existing area resulted in a four bed unit with continuous pulse oximetry, apnea, and bradycardia monitoring capabilities. The development of the Monitored Room was a clinical project designed to maximize resources and optimize patient safety. The CNS played a pivotal role in the development and staff education.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMonitored Room Development and Implementation: The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in Maximizing Resources and Optimizing Patient Safetyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Harrieten_US
dc.author.detailsHarriet Miller, MSN, ARNP, Shands Children's Hospital at the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164146-
dc.description.abstractShands Children's Hospital at the University of Florida is a hospital located within a hospital. It provides specialized care for complex cases in an academic medical center. Optimizing patient safety and maximizing resources were identified goals. Problem identification included: 1) the growing need to empty pediatric intensive care unit and intermediate care unit beds to accommodate the growing population of post-surgical and trauma patients, and 2) the need for a monitored area to care for patients who needed closer observation than the pediatric floor, but less than the intermediate care unit. Examples of such patients were those with a stable tracheostomy, and those requiring nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). A multidisciplinary team comprised of nurses, managers and directors, respiratory therapists, the pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS), and physicians met to develop guidelines for the Monitored Room. Admission criteria, orders, and the frequency of assessments and interventions were developed. The CNS worked closely with the staff in designing the nurse training and development which included modular, video, and hands on aspects. The nurses from the pediatric floor cross-trained with the staff of the intensive care unit in working with patients who would meet the admission specifications. Minor modifications to a pre-existing area resulted in a four bed unit with continuous pulse oximetry, apnea, and bradycardia monitoring capabilities. The development of the Monitored Room was a clinical project designed to maximize resources and optimize patient safety. The CNS played a pivotal role in the development and staff education.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:53Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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