2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164147
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
From Cloudy to Clear: Unscrambling the Intricacies of Diabetes Care
Author(s):
Modic, Mary Beth
Author Details:
Mary Beth Modic, RN-BC, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Problem: Thirty percent of all hospitalized patients have diabetes. Research related to diabetes has concluded that tight glycemic control of hospitalized patients reduce morbidity and mortality. However, there are many barriers to achieving this tight control. Care of diabetes is often secondary to a primary diagnosis of infection, glucocorticord therapy, surgical trauma, and decreased physical activity. Additional barriers include timing of blood glucose monitoring, nutrition interruption, misuse of sliding scale protocols, and lack of knowledge amongst nursing staff about current management strategies. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to give the bedside nurse the "tools", "rules" and "skills" to manage the diabetic patient more effectively. Objectives: (1) Describe the barriers to achieving glycemic control in the hospitalized diabetic patient. (2) Identify three strategies the CNS can use to facilitate positive outcomes in the diabetic patient. Project Description: A comprehensive approach was taken to educate nursing staff, develop protocols, and support nurses in the practice of diabetes management. The project was led by a CNS with collaboration from an outpatient NP and a hospital based NP. Methods: This multifaceted project involved establishing a multidisciplinary team to identify obstacles to effective management; develop and disseminate protocols; create unit-based diabetic resource nurse who interfaced with the medical staff and supported nursing staff in clinical decision making, revise documentation to facilitate communication amongst disciplines; promote the new ACE guidelines by a question/case of the week posted on nursing units, and develop weekly interactive educational sessions. Outcomes: Forty Diabetic Resource Nurses have been educated and work at the unit level to provide support to staff nurse colleagues. They are conversant with the current science driving tight glycemic control, and are consulted by their peers to resolve clinical issues. One hundred and fifty staff nurses within the Heart Center have attended monthly educational sessions presented by CNSs, NPs, dietitians, pharmacists, and physicians. The feedback from these sessions has been extremely positive. Protocols for SSI, hypoglycemic management, and nutrition interruption have been created and disseminated. The impact on glycemic control and error reduction has been positive although data collection is in its early stages at this time. Conclusions/Implications for Practice: The Clinical Nurse Specialist is intensely aware of the interplay between "rules", "tools" and "skills" on patient outcomes. The CNS is well-positioned to influence the standard of care and change the practice environment. As a result of this project, nursing staff has a clear vision of the goals for glycemic control and has been given a voice in helping achieve it.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFrom Cloudy to Clear: Unscrambling the Intricacies of Diabetes Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorModic, Mary Bethen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Beth Modic, RN-BC, The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164147-
dc.description.abstractProblem: Thirty percent of all hospitalized patients have diabetes. Research related to diabetes has concluded that tight glycemic control of hospitalized patients reduce morbidity and mortality. However, there are many barriers to achieving this tight control. Care of diabetes is often secondary to a primary diagnosis of infection, glucocorticord therapy, surgical trauma, and decreased physical activity. Additional barriers include timing of blood glucose monitoring, nutrition interruption, misuse of sliding scale protocols, and lack of knowledge amongst nursing staff about current management strategies. Purpose: The purpose of this project was to give the bedside nurse the "tools", "rules" and "skills" to manage the diabetic patient more effectively. Objectives: (1) Describe the barriers to achieving glycemic control in the hospitalized diabetic patient. (2) Identify three strategies the CNS can use to facilitate positive outcomes in the diabetic patient. Project Description: A comprehensive approach was taken to educate nursing staff, develop protocols, and support nurses in the practice of diabetes management. The project was led by a CNS with collaboration from an outpatient NP and a hospital based NP. Methods: This multifaceted project involved establishing a multidisciplinary team to identify obstacles to effective management; develop and disseminate protocols; create unit-based diabetic resource nurse who interfaced with the medical staff and supported nursing staff in clinical decision making, revise documentation to facilitate communication amongst disciplines; promote the new ACE guidelines by a question/case of the week posted on nursing units, and develop weekly interactive educational sessions. Outcomes: Forty Diabetic Resource Nurses have been educated and work at the unit level to provide support to staff nurse colleagues. They are conversant with the current science driving tight glycemic control, and are consulted by their peers to resolve clinical issues. One hundred and fifty staff nurses within the Heart Center have attended monthly educational sessions presented by CNSs, NPs, dietitians, pharmacists, and physicians. The feedback from these sessions has been extremely positive. Protocols for SSI, hypoglycemic management, and nutrition interruption have been created and disseminated. The impact on glycemic control and error reduction has been positive although data collection is in its early stages at this time. Conclusions/Implications for Practice: The Clinical Nurse Specialist is intensely aware of the interplay between "rules", "tools" and "skills" on patient outcomes. The CNS is well-positioned to influence the standard of care and change the practice environment. As a result of this project, nursing staff has a clear vision of the goals for glycemic control and has been given a voice in helping achieve it.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:42:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:42:54Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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