Describing RNs' Attitudes Toward Bariatric Patients: An Intervening Influence on Quality of Nursing Care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164152
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Describing RNs' Attitudes Toward Bariatric Patients: An Intervening Influence on Quality of Nursing Care
Author(s):
Rager Zuzelo, Patti
Author Details:
Patti Rager Zuzelo, EdD, APRN, BC, CNS, LaSalle University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Problem and Significance: Bariatric patients have a body mass index greater than 40% or are 100 pounds over ideal body weight Obese individuals experience stigma throughout their lives, including in their interactions with health professionals. Patient-nurse interactions may have the potential to be constructive or destructive processes, perhaps related to nurse attitudes. Bariatric focused educational programming may be more effective if RNs' attitudes are known and addressed. This study measured RNs' attitudes toward obese adult patients using a non-experimental design with survey instrumentation. Research Questions: What are the attitudes of RNs toward obese adults? Is there a relationship between RN attitudes toward obese adult patients to educational preparation, self-reported body size, years of experience, type of unit, and work setting? Are there differences in attitudes toward obese adult patients between RNs working in hospital, acute rehabilitation, or skilled care facilities? Methods: Full-time RNs employed in a medical center, acute rehabilitation institution, and skilled nursing facility responded to The Nurses' Attitudes Toward Obese Adult Patients Scale, a 28-item survey with established content validity. An open-ended statement was added to the instrument to elicit comments. Findings: Overall RN response rate was 16.2% with institutional response rates ranging from 14.9% to 28.6%. The overall attitude score (M = 3.32) demonstrated a positive attitude toward obese adults. There were no statistically significant relationships between demographic variables to attitude scores. Test of homogeneity of variance justified the assumption of equal variances for the three groups (Levene Statistic = 1.454; p = .238). One-way ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences in mean score based upon institutional type (F = 11.935; p = .000). Post-hoc Scheffe procedure (p = .000) identified a statistically significant difference between the mean scores of acute rehabilitation RNs (M = 2.91; S.D. = .499) versus medical center RNs (M = 3.41; S.D. = .376). Analysis of RN comments revealed several themes including: Believing obese patients deserve equal treatment, Recognizing unique care needs, Feeling overwhelmed by care needs, and Making an effort to avoid hurtful encounters. Implications for Practice: CNSs should acknowledge RNs' safety concerns and workload worries when addressing bariatric nursing care. Many RNs are ambivalent about obesity and need to improve their knowledge base. Stigmatizing behaviors, verbal and non-verbal, may not be recognized by RNs. Discussion may encourage self-awareness and promote improved practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDescribing RNs' Attitudes Toward Bariatric Patients: An Intervening Influence on Quality of Nursing Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRager Zuzelo, Pattien_US
dc.author.detailsPatti Rager Zuzelo, EdD, APRN, BC, CNS, LaSalle University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164152-
dc.description.abstractProblem and Significance: Bariatric patients have a body mass index greater than 40% or are 100 pounds over ideal body weight Obese individuals experience stigma throughout their lives, including in their interactions with health professionals. Patient-nurse interactions may have the potential to be constructive or destructive processes, perhaps related to nurse attitudes. Bariatric focused educational programming may be more effective if RNs' attitudes are known and addressed. This study measured RNs' attitudes toward obese adult patients using a non-experimental design with survey instrumentation. Research Questions: What are the attitudes of RNs toward obese adults? Is there a relationship between RN attitudes toward obese adult patients to educational preparation, self-reported body size, years of experience, type of unit, and work setting? Are there differences in attitudes toward obese adult patients between RNs working in hospital, acute rehabilitation, or skilled care facilities? Methods: Full-time RNs employed in a medical center, acute rehabilitation institution, and skilled nursing facility responded to The Nurses' Attitudes Toward Obese Adult Patients Scale, a 28-item survey with established content validity. An open-ended statement was added to the instrument to elicit comments. Findings: Overall RN response rate was 16.2% with institutional response rates ranging from 14.9% to 28.6%. The overall attitude score (M = 3.32) demonstrated a positive attitude toward obese adults. There were no statistically significant relationships between demographic variables to attitude scores. Test of homogeneity of variance justified the assumption of equal variances for the three groups (Levene Statistic = 1.454; p = .238). One-way ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences in mean score based upon institutional type (F = 11.935; p = .000). Post-hoc Scheffe procedure (p = .000) identified a statistically significant difference between the mean scores of acute rehabilitation RNs (M = 2.91; S.D. = .499) versus medical center RNs (M = 3.41; S.D. = .376). Analysis of RN comments revealed several themes including: Believing obese patients deserve equal treatment, Recognizing unique care needs, Feeling overwhelmed by care needs, and Making an effort to avoid hurtful encounters. Implications for Practice: CNSs should acknowledge RNs' safety concerns and workload worries when addressing bariatric nursing care. Many RNs are ambivalent about obesity and need to improve their knowledge base. Stigmatizing behaviors, verbal and non-verbal, may not be recognized by RNs. Discussion may encourage self-awareness and promote improved practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:00Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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