CNS Competencies Influencing the Journey toward a Professional Nursing Practice Model Influencing Magnet Designation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164159
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CNS Competencies Influencing the Journey toward a Professional Nursing Practice Model Influencing Magnet Designation
Author(s):
Sitterding, Mary
Author Details:
Mary Sitterding, MSN, CNS, Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Background: Forces of magnetism (McClure et.al, 1983) have been identified as those elements that contribute to an organizational culture that allows patients to receive excellent care from nurses practicing in an excellent health care environment. Those forces include: 1) quality of nursing leadership; 2) organizational structure; 3) management style; 4) personnel policies and programs; 5) professional models of care; 6) quality of care; 7) quality improvement; 8) consultation and resources; 9) autonomy; 10) community and the hospital; 11) nurses as teachers; 12) image of nursing; 13) interdisciplinary relationships; and 14) professional development (McClure, M. & Hinshaw, A., 2002). In 1992, the CNO of a regional organization set out to develop a professional nursing practice model that included the development of a differentiated nursing practice model that included clinical nurse specialists. Description: The development of the professional nursing practice model began with a needs assessment. The objectives of the needs assessment included the following: 1) examine professional nursing practice within the organization; 2) identify nursing services authority within the organization; 3) identify nursing service position of influence within the organization; 4) identify differentiation between nursing roles; 5) identify the bedside nursing contribution to the interdisciplinary practice team. Findings were remarkable. What followed was the development and implementation of strategies aimed at advancing the practice of nursing and patient care within the organization. Strategies included: 1) establish a Professional Nursing Steering Committee including clinical nurse specialists; 2) identify, educate, excite, and embed professional nursing practice standards; 3) examine better performer practice models integrating differentiated nursing practice; 4) build and measure the effect of differentiated nursing practice; 5) design interdisciplinary practice teams led by the clinical nurse specialist; 6) implement and measure the effect of 1st generation practice teams; 7) enhance and measure the effect of 2nd generation practice teams; 8) design and implement shared governance led by bedside (sharp-end) nursing and facilitated by clinical nurse specialists; 9) measure the effectiveness of this model; and 10) based upon measurement findings - raise the bar. Outcome: To measure the effectiveness of this 10 year journey toward professional nursing practice, a small group of nurses led by the CNO, the Director for Clinical Practice and the Lead, Clinical Nurse Specialist came together to write summaries and pull evidence of what was perceived to be a professional nursing practice model. The outcome experienced was that we were the first and only hospital in the state to achieve Magnet designation. Additional outcomes experienced included but were not limited to bedside nurse (sharp-end) activation to raise the bar! Conclusions/Implications for Practice: On multiple occasions, the Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) for this organization shares that the clinical nurse specialist competencies were integral to achievement of a professional nursing practice model resulting in Magnet designation. CNS competencies within the patient, provider and system spheres influencing the design, testing, and evaluation of strategies toward a professional practice journey are expertly described in the Statement on Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice and Education (NACNS, 2004).
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCNS Competencies Influencing the Journey toward a Professional Nursing Practice Model Influencing Magnet Designationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSitterding, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Sitterding, MSN, CNS, Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164159-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Forces of magnetism (McClure et.al, 1983) have been identified as those elements that contribute to an organizational culture that allows patients to receive excellent care from nurses practicing in an excellent health care environment. Those forces include: 1) quality of nursing leadership; 2) organizational structure; 3) management style; 4) personnel policies and programs; 5) professional models of care; 6) quality of care; 7) quality improvement; 8) consultation and resources; 9) autonomy; 10) community and the hospital; 11) nurses as teachers; 12) image of nursing; 13) interdisciplinary relationships; and 14) professional development (McClure, M. & Hinshaw, A., 2002). In 1992, the CNO of a regional organization set out to develop a professional nursing practice model that included the development of a differentiated nursing practice model that included clinical nurse specialists. Description: The development of the professional nursing practice model began with a needs assessment. The objectives of the needs assessment included the following: 1) examine professional nursing practice within the organization; 2) identify nursing services authority within the organization; 3) identify nursing service position of influence within the organization; 4) identify differentiation between nursing roles; 5) identify the bedside nursing contribution to the interdisciplinary practice team. Findings were remarkable. What followed was the development and implementation of strategies aimed at advancing the practice of nursing and patient care within the organization. Strategies included: 1) establish a Professional Nursing Steering Committee including clinical nurse specialists; 2) identify, educate, excite, and embed professional nursing practice standards; 3) examine better performer practice models integrating differentiated nursing practice; 4) build and measure the effect of differentiated nursing practice; 5) design interdisciplinary practice teams led by the clinical nurse specialist; 6) implement and measure the effect of 1st generation practice teams; 7) enhance and measure the effect of 2nd generation practice teams; 8) design and implement shared governance led by bedside (sharp-end) nursing and facilitated by clinical nurse specialists; 9) measure the effectiveness of this model; and 10) based upon measurement findings - raise the bar. Outcome: To measure the effectiveness of this 10 year journey toward professional nursing practice, a small group of nurses led by the CNO, the Director for Clinical Practice and the Lead, Clinical Nurse Specialist came together to write summaries and pull evidence of what was perceived to be a professional nursing practice model. The outcome experienced was that we were the first and only hospital in the state to achieve Magnet designation. Additional outcomes experienced included but were not limited to bedside nurse (sharp-end) activation to raise the bar! Conclusions/Implications for Practice: On multiple occasions, the Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) for this organization shares that the clinical nurse specialist competencies were integral to achievement of a professional nursing practice model resulting in Magnet designation. CNS competencies within the patient, provider and system spheres influencing the design, testing, and evaluation of strategies toward a professional practice journey are expertly described in the Statement on Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice and Education (NACNS, 2004).en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:08Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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