Developing a Physiologic Model to Explain Cold Salt and Soda Mouthwash Intervention for Pain Associated with Oral Mucositis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164161
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developing a Physiologic Model to Explain Cold Salt and Soda Mouthwash Intervention for Pain Associated with Oral Mucositis
Author(s):
Treon, Michelle; Fulton, Janet S.
Author Details:
Michelle Treon, BSN, RN, Clarian Health Partners, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Janet S. Fulton PhD, RN, Indiana University School of Nursing , Indianapolis, Indiana, USA
Abstract:
Purpose: Oral mucositis is a frequent and dose-limiting side effect of cancer treatment, experienced by 40% of chemotherapy and up to 80% of bone marrow transplant patients. Bone marrow transplant patients rated oral mucositis as the single most debilitating side effect over nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fatigue. Oral mucositis increases length of stay an average 5 additional days, and involves costs up to $50,000. No interventions are available to prevent or reduce severity; therefore effective palliative strategies are needed to decrease the pain and associated distress that accompanies oral mucositis. Cold salt and soda mouthwash is often prescribed as an intervention, however, there is little research to validate the effectiveness of this intervention and the rationale for the intervention is not well described. The model developed explores the physiological basis of cold salt and soda mouthwash as an intervention for pain associated with oral mucositis and offers a model that may be useful in future research. Rationale: Two models explaining the physiologic rationale of mucositis were located in the literature. One model outlined the cellular level development of mucositis, describing the process of tissue destruction; the second model outlined the consequences of tissue destruction. Neither model described the pathway of mucositis pain adequately enough to identify the physiologic rationale for the cold salt and soda mouthwash intervention. Model Development: Literature that was reviewed included the cellular physiology of the mouth, the pathophysiology of cellular damage secondary to chemotherapy, chemical and mechanical nociception in the oral cavity, and the inflammatory process and its contribution to chemical nociception. Outcome: The model derived to explain the rationale for the intervention theorizes that cold salt and soda mouthwashes interrupt the pain pathway prior to nociception, thus blocking the mechanical and chemical pathway that lead to pain and distress while promoting repair of cellular damage and providing oral hygiene. Interpretation: A better understanding of the theoretical basis of interventions will help ground clinical practice interventions in scientific principles and can assist in designing and explaining research. Implications for Nursing Practice: Salt and soda mouthwashes are listed as an intervention for mucositis management in guidelines published by the National Cancer Institute. This model helps to explain the scientific basis of the intervention and can give clinicians confidence when using the intervention in clinical care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeveloping a Physiologic Model to Explain Cold Salt and Soda Mouthwash Intervention for Pain Associated with Oral Mucositisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTreon, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorFulton, Janet S.en_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Treon, BSN, RN, Clarian Health Partners, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Janet S. Fulton PhD, RN, Indiana University School of Nursing , Indianapolis, Indiana, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164161-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Oral mucositis is a frequent and dose-limiting side effect of cancer treatment, experienced by 40% of chemotherapy and up to 80% of bone marrow transplant patients. Bone marrow transplant patients rated oral mucositis as the single most debilitating side effect over nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and fatigue. Oral mucositis increases length of stay an average 5 additional days, and involves costs up to $50,000. No interventions are available to prevent or reduce severity; therefore effective palliative strategies are needed to decrease the pain and associated distress that accompanies oral mucositis. Cold salt and soda mouthwash is often prescribed as an intervention, however, there is little research to validate the effectiveness of this intervention and the rationale for the intervention is not well described. The model developed explores the physiological basis of cold salt and soda mouthwash as an intervention for pain associated with oral mucositis and offers a model that may be useful in future research. Rationale: Two models explaining the physiologic rationale of mucositis were located in the literature. One model outlined the cellular level development of mucositis, describing the process of tissue destruction; the second model outlined the consequences of tissue destruction. Neither model described the pathway of mucositis pain adequately enough to identify the physiologic rationale for the cold salt and soda mouthwash intervention. Model Development: Literature that was reviewed included the cellular physiology of the mouth, the pathophysiology of cellular damage secondary to chemotherapy, chemical and mechanical nociception in the oral cavity, and the inflammatory process and its contribution to chemical nociception. Outcome: The model derived to explain the rationale for the intervention theorizes that cold salt and soda mouthwashes interrupt the pain pathway prior to nociception, thus blocking the mechanical and chemical pathway that lead to pain and distress while promoting repair of cellular damage and providing oral hygiene. Interpretation: A better understanding of the theoretical basis of interventions will help ground clinical practice interventions in scientific principles and can assist in designing and explaining research. Implications for Nursing Practice: Salt and soda mouthwashes are listed as an intervention for mucositis management in guidelines published by the National Cancer Institute. This model helps to explain the scientific basis of the intervention and can give clinicians confidence when using the intervention in clinical care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:10Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.