2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164162
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Controlling Blood Culture Contamination
Author(s):
Zanotti, Jennifer A.
Author Details:
Jennifer A. Zanotti, MS, RN, CCRN, CEN, CNS, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury, Maryland, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Problem: Contamination of blood cultures is a common problem. False-positive blood culture results may lead to errors in clinical interpretation; administration of inappropriate antibiotics; increased length of hospital stays and increased costs. Significance: Blood culture contamination rates were exceedingly high in our emergency department with rates averaging 7% despite extensive educational efforts for Emergency Department registered nurses led by the hospital's infection control and microbiology laboratory personnel. The new Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) for the emergency department was challenged by the nursing director to lead efforts to decrease blood culture contamination rates. Description of Project: After assessing the problem, the CNS focused on two themes in this project 1. Creating an environment making it is easy for nurses to do the right thing 2. Providing education focusing on the significance of the problem, the research, and how to translate that research into practice. The CNS developed blood culture contamination bags. The CNS with the help of hospital volunteers packaged together all blood culture bottles with tincture of iodine and 70% alcohol prep pads in the lab specimen bag. Also included in this bag was a copy of our campaign slogan "SO the skin's bugs can die...let your preps dry...1 minute!" The registered nurses and nursing techs therefore always had the right prep readily available along with a reminder regarding drying times. Education was provided to registered nurses and techs by the CNS in the format of 10 minute educational roving sessions. The CNS was available to reinforce teaching during the times of lower census and acuity in the busy E.D. The campaign slogan was also posted through the department. Outcomes: The Emergency Department's blood culture contamination rates dropped to 3.4% and 3.3% in the two months following this effort. The CNS has celebrated the success with the E.D. and continues to lead efforts to further decrease our rates to <3%. Implications for Practice: This project supports that by providing resources and evidenced-based education blood culture contamination rates can be decreased significantly. The themes the CNS utilized for this practice change can be translated into other practice changes. This project also supports the role of the CNS in improving patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2005
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Orlando, Florida, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleControlling Blood Culture Contaminationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZanotti, Jennifer A.en_US
dc.author.detailsJennifer A. Zanotti, MS, RN, CCRN, CEN, CNS, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury, Maryland, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164162-
dc.description.abstractProblem: Contamination of blood cultures is a common problem. False-positive blood culture results may lead to errors in clinical interpretation; administration of inappropriate antibiotics; increased length of hospital stays and increased costs. Significance: Blood culture contamination rates were exceedingly high in our emergency department with rates averaging 7% despite extensive educational efforts for Emergency Department registered nurses led by the hospital's infection control and microbiology laboratory personnel. The new Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) for the emergency department was challenged by the nursing director to lead efforts to decrease blood culture contamination rates. Description of Project: After assessing the problem, the CNS focused on two themes in this project 1. Creating an environment making it is easy for nurses to do the right thing 2. Providing education focusing on the significance of the problem, the research, and how to translate that research into practice. The CNS developed blood culture contamination bags. The CNS with the help of hospital volunteers packaged together all blood culture bottles with tincture of iodine and 70% alcohol prep pads in the lab specimen bag. Also included in this bag was a copy of our campaign slogan "SO the skin's bugs can die...let your preps dry...1 minute!" The registered nurses and nursing techs therefore always had the right prep readily available along with a reminder regarding drying times. Education was provided to registered nurses and techs by the CNS in the format of 10 minute educational roving sessions. The CNS was available to reinforce teaching during the times of lower census and acuity in the busy E.D. The campaign slogan was also posted through the department. Outcomes: The Emergency Department's blood culture contamination rates dropped to 3.4% and 3.3% in the two months following this effort. The CNS has celebrated the success with the E.D. and continues to lead efforts to further decrease our rates to <3%. Implications for Practice: This project supports that by providing resources and evidenced-based education blood culture contamination rates can be decreased significantly. The themes the CNS utilized for this practice change can be translated into other practice changes. This project also supports the role of the CNS in improving patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:11Z-
dc.conference.date2005en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationOrlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Navigating the Healthcare Environment Toward Excellence, held on March 9�12, 2005 in Orlando, Florida, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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