2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164164
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using the CNS Role to Promote Safety and Quality in Long Term Care
Author(s):
Alderman, Joanne; Borges, Wanda J.; Walent, Ron; Williams, Sheila
Author Details:
Joanne Alderman, MS-N, RN, BC, APRN, Tulsa Regional Medical Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Wanda J. Borges, DNS, RN, CNS, New Mexico State University, Las Cruses, New Mexico, USA; Ron Walent, MS, RN, CNS, BC, The University of California, San Francisco, California, USA; Sheila Williams, MSN, RN, CNS, Dayton VMAC, Dayton, Ohio, USA
Abstract:
Purpose: This presentation explores actual and potential roles for the CNS in improving safety and quality in residential long term care (RLTC). Attendees will (1) achieve clearer understanding of clinical, regulatory and organizational challenges facing the CNS in RLTC and (2) appreciate the CNS role in advancing quality and safety in RLTC. Significance: Despite programs enabling more older adults to age in place, concurrent increases in elders requiring complex care suggests the need for RLTC settings will persist. While the value of CNSs in promoting safety and quality in acute care is well recognized, little has been done to capitalize on their expertise in increasingly challenging RLTC settings. Background/Design: In RLTC settings, major issues related to patient safety (e.g., falls, infections, wandering) and quality (e.g., pressure ulcers, nutrition and hydration, comfort, ADL function, depression) have been identified. Lack of expertise to guide significant change means that improvement strategies are often "all-purpose" and poorly designed, implemented and evaluated. Although expected outcomes for safety and quality are clear, achieving results commonly requires complex interventions that encompass the health care system and nursing practice spheres of influence and demand advanced ability in chronic disease management. Methods: The Summer of 2004 marked the establishment of the Ad Hoc Committee on Long Term Care of the NACNS Gerontological Task Force. Committee meetings, conference calls, consultation with LTC experts, and literature review have resulted in comprehensive understanding of the CNS/RLTC interface that informs this presentation. Findings: Analysis suggests individuals and groups outside and within nursing have tended to devalue RLTC practice. Additionally, organizational and regulatory may hinder CNS practice in RLTC settings. Conclusions: Addressing barriers is essential to advancing the CNS role. Role elements include: (1) managing residents with complex chronic care and behavioral needs, (2) developing and promoting RLTC competencies for nursing staff at all levels (3) identifying elements of RLTC that justify specialty practice, (4) functioning as leader/change agent in specific areas of safety and quality. Implications for Practice: Delineating and promoting CNS role in RLTC is needed to improve cost-effective care, resident safety, quality of care and quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing the CNS Role to Promote Safety and Quality in Long Term Careen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAlderman, Joanneen_US
dc.contributor.authorBorges, Wanda J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWalent, Ronen_US
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Sheilaen_US
dc.author.detailsJoanne Alderman, MS-N, RN, BC, APRN, Tulsa Regional Medical Center, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Wanda J. Borges, DNS, RN, CNS, New Mexico State University, Las Cruses, New Mexico, USA; Ron Walent, MS, RN, CNS, BC, The University of California, San Francisco, California, USA; Sheila Williams, MSN, RN, CNS, Dayton VMAC, Dayton, Ohio, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164164-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This presentation explores actual and potential roles for the CNS in improving safety and quality in residential long term care (RLTC). Attendees will (1) achieve clearer understanding of clinical, regulatory and organizational challenges facing the CNS in RLTC and (2) appreciate the CNS role in advancing quality and safety in RLTC. Significance: Despite programs enabling more older adults to age in place, concurrent increases in elders requiring complex care suggests the need for RLTC settings will persist. While the value of CNSs in promoting safety and quality in acute care is well recognized, little has been done to capitalize on their expertise in increasingly challenging RLTC settings. Background/Design: In RLTC settings, major issues related to patient safety (e.g., falls, infections, wandering) and quality (e.g., pressure ulcers, nutrition and hydration, comfort, ADL function, depression) have been identified. Lack of expertise to guide significant change means that improvement strategies are often "all-purpose" and poorly designed, implemented and evaluated. Although expected outcomes for safety and quality are clear, achieving results commonly requires complex interventions that encompass the health care system and nursing practice spheres of influence and demand advanced ability in chronic disease management. Methods: The Summer of 2004 marked the establishment of the Ad Hoc Committee on Long Term Care of the NACNS Gerontological Task Force. Committee meetings, conference calls, consultation with LTC experts, and literature review have resulted in comprehensive understanding of the CNS/RLTC interface that informs this presentation. Findings: Analysis suggests individuals and groups outside and within nursing have tended to devalue RLTC practice. Additionally, organizational and regulatory may hinder CNS practice in RLTC settings. Conclusions: Addressing barriers is essential to advancing the CNS role. Role elements include: (1) managing residents with complex chronic care and behavioral needs, (2) developing and promoting RLTC competencies for nursing staff at all levels (3) identifying elements of RLTC that justify specialty practice, (4) functioning as leader/change agent in specific areas of safety and quality. Implications for Practice: Delineating and promoting CNS role in RLTC is needed to improve cost-effective care, resident safety, quality of care and quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:13Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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