2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164165
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Hand Hygiene Adherence Among Healthcare Providers
Author(s):
Allen, Marianne; Clement, Mary Ann; Fowler, Kimberly A.; Harne-Britner, Sarah
Author Details:
Marianne Allen, MN, RNC, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Mary Ann Clement, MSN, RN, CRNR; Kimberly A. Fowler, MSN, RN; Sarah Harne-Britner, MSN, RN, CCRN
Abstract:
Purpose: Describe a collaborative research study examining the effects of staff education and behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence and unit-acquired infection rates. Significance: Clinical Nurse Specialists are responsible for promoting patient safety across the health system. Hand hygiene is the simplest, most effective way to prevent noscomial infections (Pittet, 2001) and has been identified as a Patient Safety Goal for JCAHO. Previous studies have reported hand hygiene adherence rates varying from 20-80% among healthcare workers (Larson et al, 2000). Background/Design: Clinical Nurse Specialists collaborated with nursing faculty, staff nurses and nursing students to design the study. A quasi-experimental design examined the effects of education paired with two types of behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence. Methods: Three medical-surgical units participated in the study. One control group and two experimental groups were randomly selected. The CNS facilitated baseline and ongoing collection of hand hygiene observations using the Hand Hygiene Assessment Tool (KR = 0.94). Each group completed a self-study hand hygiene educational module. Experimental group 1 received behavioral interventions of individual/ group rewards for improved adherence. Experimental group 2 received a behavioral intervention focusing on the risks of non-adherence with hand hygiene. Hand hygiene adherence and infection rates were monitored for six months following the interventions. Findings: A total of 1203 hand hygiene observations were analyzed using a Z-test. Experimental Group 1 had significant change in hand hygiene adherence after education (p =.01) and sustained improvement in hand hygiene adherence over six months compared to control group (p =.03). The Control Group and Experimental Group 2 showed no statistically significant changes in hand hygiene adherence over six months. No correlation was identified between unit-acquired infection rates and hand hygiene adherence. Conclusions: Education paired with positive reinforcement improves hand hygiene adherence and impacts clinical practice. The study limitations included non-equivalent study units, higher baseline adherence in control unit and a non-concealed observation method. Implications for Practice: Clinical Nurse Specialists are collaborating with the Manager of Accreditation to implement system wide education and positive reinforcement strategies to improve hand hygiene adherence.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Hand Hygiene Adherence Among Healthcare Providersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Marianneen_US
dc.contributor.authorClement, Mary Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Kimberly A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHarne-Britner, Sarahen_US
dc.author.detailsMarianne Allen, MN, RNC, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Mary Ann Clement, MSN, RN, CRNR; Kimberly A. Fowler, MSN, RN; Sarah Harne-Britner, MSN, RN, CCRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164165-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Describe a collaborative research study examining the effects of staff education and behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence and unit-acquired infection rates. Significance: Clinical Nurse Specialists are responsible for promoting patient safety across the health system. Hand hygiene is the simplest, most effective way to prevent noscomial infections (Pittet, 2001) and has been identified as a Patient Safety Goal for JCAHO. Previous studies have reported hand hygiene adherence rates varying from 20-80% among healthcare workers (Larson et al, 2000). Background/Design: Clinical Nurse Specialists collaborated with nursing faculty, staff nurses and nursing students to design the study. A quasi-experimental design examined the effects of education paired with two types of behavioral interventions on hand hygiene adherence. Methods: Three medical-surgical units participated in the study. One control group and two experimental groups were randomly selected. The CNS facilitated baseline and ongoing collection of hand hygiene observations using the Hand Hygiene Assessment Tool (KR = 0.94). Each group completed a self-study hand hygiene educational module. Experimental group 1 received behavioral interventions of individual/ group rewards for improved adherence. Experimental group 2 received a behavioral intervention focusing on the risks of non-adherence with hand hygiene. Hand hygiene adherence and infection rates were monitored for six months following the interventions. Findings: A total of 1203 hand hygiene observations were analyzed using a Z-test. Experimental Group 1 had significant change in hand hygiene adherence after education (p =.01) and sustained improvement in hand hygiene adherence over six months compared to control group (p =.03). The Control Group and Experimental Group 2 showed no statistically significant changes in hand hygiene adherence over six months. No correlation was identified between unit-acquired infection rates and hand hygiene adherence. Conclusions: Education paired with positive reinforcement improves hand hygiene adherence and impacts clinical practice. The study limitations included non-equivalent study units, higher baseline adherence in control unit and a non-concealed observation method. Implications for Practice: Clinical Nurse Specialists are collaborating with the Manager of Accreditation to implement system wide education and positive reinforcement strategies to improve hand hygiene adherence.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:15Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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