The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in the Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Rapid Response Team

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164169
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in the Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Rapid Response Team
Author(s):
Bennett, Trish; Duffy, Melanie
Author Details:
Trish Bennett, MSN, RN, CCRN, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Melanie Duffy, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNS
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of the presentation is to provide an informational framework for the Clinical Nurse Specialist whose goal is to implement a Rapid Response Team in an acute care facility. The presentation will outline the planning and educational processes necessary to operationalize the program. Significance: The presentation will provide valuable information regarding the history and key components of a Rapid Response Team. Early recognition and intervention in an unstable clinical situation will be discussed. The goal is improved patient outcomes and promotion of the concept, "caregivers helping caregivers to save lives." Background/Design: The Rapid Response Team was originally pursued by a physician in Australia based on the concept of, "failure to rescue." Studies have identified that most patients who experience a cardiopulmonary arrest have changes in physiologic parameters up to eight hours preceding the arrest. Data show that survival to discharge from in-hospital cardiac arrest ranges between 10 - 17%. Methods: Initial planning for the Rapid Response Team (RRT) included meetings to discuss the concept of an RRT and what would be required to implement a Team. The role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist throughout the process will be highlighted. Decisions to be made included: Team composition; clinical call parameters; how to activate the Team; documentation methods; institutional education; follow-up monitoring. Findings: The Rapid Response Team was activated in August 2005. A monthly average of 23 Rapid Response Team calls occurred between August 2005 and April 2006. Examples of clinical issues and interventions will be provided. Data demonstrate that as RRT calls increased, overall hospital mortality rate decreased. Updated data will be provided for the presentation. Conclusions: N/A Implications for Practice: Implications for practice include: Improved knowledge base of the non-Critical Care staff nurse through interaction with the RRT Critical Care staff nurse; prevention of a deteriorating clinical situation through a multidisciplinary team effort; empowering the staff nurse to rapidly access resources to optimize patient care and contribute to a positive outcome. The presentation will emphasize the pivotal role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in the ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the overall concept of the Rapid Response Team.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in the Implementation of a Multidisciplinary Rapid Response Teamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Trishen_US
dc.contributor.authorDuffy, Melanieen_US
dc.author.detailsTrish Bennett, MSN, RN, CCRN, Pinnacle Health System, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Melanie Duffy, MSN, RN, CCRN, CCNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164169-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of the presentation is to provide an informational framework for the Clinical Nurse Specialist whose goal is to implement a Rapid Response Team in an acute care facility. The presentation will outline the planning and educational processes necessary to operationalize the program. Significance: The presentation will provide valuable information regarding the history and key components of a Rapid Response Team. Early recognition and intervention in an unstable clinical situation will be discussed. The goal is improved patient outcomes and promotion of the concept, "caregivers helping caregivers to save lives." Background/Design: The Rapid Response Team was originally pursued by a physician in Australia based on the concept of, "failure to rescue." Studies have identified that most patients who experience a cardiopulmonary arrest have changes in physiologic parameters up to eight hours preceding the arrest. Data show that survival to discharge from in-hospital cardiac arrest ranges between 10 - 17%. Methods: Initial planning for the Rapid Response Team (RRT) included meetings to discuss the concept of an RRT and what would be required to implement a Team. The role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist throughout the process will be highlighted. Decisions to be made included: Team composition; clinical call parameters; how to activate the Team; documentation methods; institutional education; follow-up monitoring. Findings: The Rapid Response Team was activated in August 2005. A monthly average of 23 Rapid Response Team calls occurred between August 2005 and April 2006. Examples of clinical issues and interventions will be provided. Data demonstrate that as RRT calls increased, overall hospital mortality rate decreased. Updated data will be provided for the presentation. Conclusions: N/A Implications for Practice: Implications for practice include: Improved knowledge base of the non-Critical Care staff nurse through interaction with the RRT Critical Care staff nurse; prevention of a deteriorating clinical situation through a multidisciplinary team effort; empowering the staff nurse to rapidly access resources to optimize patient care and contribute to a positive outcome. The presentation will emphasize the pivotal role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist in the ongoing monitoring and evaluation of the overall concept of the Rapid Response Team.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:19Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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