2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164172
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Influence of CNS Mentoring a Maternal-Child Practice Council in a Magnet Hospital
Author(s):
Campbell, Margie
Author Details:
Margie Campbell, MSN, RNC, CNS, Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe the impact of CNS mentoring a Maternal-Child Practice Council in improving safety outcomes. This collaborative work impacts the nurse, the patient and the organization by providing safe, evidence-based care. Significance: The CNS advances nursing practice and improves patient outcomes by updating nursing practice using evidence-based standards of care that direct nursing actions. To improve patient outcomes the CNS mentors the bedside nurse in the development of evidence-based guidelines, policies, procedures and protocols with means to implement them. Background/Design: Columbus Regional Hospital, a Magnet hospital, uses a differentiated nursing practice model where the CNS leads, supports, and mentors the bedside nurse in planning care, managing complicated patients and influence nursing practice by utilizing evidence-based guidelines. The bedside nurses assume responsibility and authority for the coordination of patient care and accountability for their own practice. The Birthing Center Practice Council consists of a group of bedside nurses whose common goal is to promote autonomy and empowerment to change practice on their unit. The Council consists of obstetric and neonatal bedside nurses. The Council had been inactive for over a year. The nurses needed mentoring and leadership to regain control of their practice. Methods: The initial focus of the council centered on quality and safety intuitives such as designing drills for obstetric emergencies. The CNS reviewed current literature, networked with colleagues for additional resources. The council reviewed the information, decided the scope of the drills and the plan for implementation. The next council focus involved safe administration of magnesium sulfate. The CNS mentored the group in techniques of reviewing the literature and designing new protocols. Council members revised policies, collaborated with pharmacy to obtain pre-packaged magnesium sulfate in 500mL bags and design new brighter tags for the tubing and bags. Findings: The Birthing Center staff successfully completed the emergency drills over several weeks, evaluated practice and recommended changes. The Council is now tracking high-risk emergencies and designed a follow-up tool to monitor outcomes. Changes in the magnesium sulfate policy have decreased the possibility of medication errors. The Council with support from the CNS is tracking magnesium sulfate medication errors and near misses. Conclusions: The Council remains activated and continues making a positive impact on daily nursing practice in the Birthing Center. The experience with the Birthing Center Practice Council demonstrates the impact of CNS mentoring and leadership to advancing the practice of nursing among nurses. Implications for Practice : Using a differentiated practice model where the CNS leads, supports and mentor the bedside nurse enables those nurses to develop their own skills and accountability for their practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Influence of CNS Mentoring a Maternal-Child Practice Council in a Magnet Hospitalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Margieen_US
dc.author.detailsMargie Campbell, MSN, RNC, CNS, Columbus Regional Hospital, Columbus, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164172-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the impact of CNS mentoring a Maternal-Child Practice Council in improving safety outcomes. This collaborative work impacts the nurse, the patient and the organization by providing safe, evidence-based care. Significance: The CNS advances nursing practice and improves patient outcomes by updating nursing practice using evidence-based standards of care that direct nursing actions. To improve patient outcomes the CNS mentors the bedside nurse in the development of evidence-based guidelines, policies, procedures and protocols with means to implement them. Background/Design: Columbus Regional Hospital, a Magnet hospital, uses a differentiated nursing practice model where the CNS leads, supports, and mentors the bedside nurse in planning care, managing complicated patients and influence nursing practice by utilizing evidence-based guidelines. The bedside nurses assume responsibility and authority for the coordination of patient care and accountability for their own practice. The Birthing Center Practice Council consists of a group of bedside nurses whose common goal is to promote autonomy and empowerment to change practice on their unit. The Council consists of obstetric and neonatal bedside nurses. The Council had been inactive for over a year. The nurses needed mentoring and leadership to regain control of their practice. Methods: The initial focus of the council centered on quality and safety intuitives such as designing drills for obstetric emergencies. The CNS reviewed current literature, networked with colleagues for additional resources. The council reviewed the information, decided the scope of the drills and the plan for implementation. The next council focus involved safe administration of magnesium sulfate. The CNS mentored the group in techniques of reviewing the literature and designing new protocols. Council members revised policies, collaborated with pharmacy to obtain pre-packaged magnesium sulfate in 500mL bags and design new brighter tags for the tubing and bags. Findings: The Birthing Center staff successfully completed the emergency drills over several weeks, evaluated practice and recommended changes. The Council is now tracking high-risk emergencies and designed a follow-up tool to monitor outcomes. Changes in the magnesium sulfate policy have decreased the possibility of medication errors. The Council with support from the CNS is tracking magnesium sulfate medication errors and near misses. Conclusions: The Council remains activated and continues making a positive impact on daily nursing practice in the Birthing Center. The experience with the Birthing Center Practice Council demonstrates the impact of CNS mentoring and leadership to advancing the practice of nursing among nurses. Implications for Practice : Using a differentiated practice model where the CNS leads, supports and mentor the bedside nurse enables those nurses to develop their own skills and accountability for their practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:22Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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