CNS Student Competencies in Outcomes Planning and Evaluation: Curricular Considerations and Exemplars

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164173
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CNS Student Competencies in Outcomes Planning and Evaluation: Curricular Considerations and Exemplars
Author(s):
Canfield, Christina; Coughlin, Rose; Jacobson, Ann; Ludwick, Ruth
Author Details:
Christina Canfield, MSN, RN, CNS, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Rose Coughlin, MSN, RN, CNS; Ann Jacobson, PhD, RN; Ruth Ludwick, PhD, RNC, CNS
Abstract:
Purpose: This collaborative faculty-student poster presents one CNS program's curricular strategies for developing, applying, and evaluating students' competencies in outcome planning and evaluation. Significance: The importance of outcome measurement has long been emphasized by CNSs and effecting nurse-sensitive and other outcomes has been the hallmark of CNS success. This project shows how CNS faculty can bridge the gap between education and the real world of the CNS in developing outcomes-based programs. Background/Design: The NACNS Statement on Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice and Education emphasizes the importance of developing CNS competencies for evaluating patient, CNS practice, and nurse-sensitive outcomes. Therefore, to adequately prepare students for CNS practice, educational programs must provide foundational experiences in planning and evaluating programs for nurse-sensitive outcomes. Methods: Prerequisite knowledge and skills for developing an outcomes project and their introduction throughout the CNS curriculum in core and clinical courses are identified. Using exemplars of completed student projects in such areas as medication reconciliation, heart failure guideline implementation, and palliative care, this poster details the processes used and the outcomes achieved by students in their capstone practicum experience. The four stages involved in planning and executing the projects, including barriers and facilitators, are outlined. Peer, faculty, and self-evaluation methods for the project are presented. Findings: Seven students completed projects in May 2006. Students, preceptors, and faculty members returned overall positive evaluations of the educational and clinical importance of the learning experience. Areas for improvement included the need for earlier development of organizational assessment skills and for a longer time frame to fully implement and evaluate the project. Several of the projects have been incorporated as ongoing initiatives in the clinical agencies, in some cases with students continuing as ongoing consultants. Conclusions: The course outcomes project is an effective tool for bridging the gap between CNS education and practice in developing student competency for the CNS role. Implications for Practice: The project highlighted the importance of core content in advanced practice nursing education, including research, ethics, culture, and health care policy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCNS Student Competencies in Outcomes Planning and Evaluation: Curricular Considerations and Exemplarsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCanfield, Christinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoughlin, Roseen_US
dc.contributor.authorJacobson, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorLudwick, Ruthen_US
dc.author.detailsChristina Canfield, MSN, RN, CNS, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Rose Coughlin, MSN, RN, CNS; Ann Jacobson, PhD, RN; Ruth Ludwick, PhD, RNC, CNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164173-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This collaborative faculty-student poster presents one CNS program's curricular strategies for developing, applying, and evaluating students' competencies in outcome planning and evaluation. Significance: The importance of outcome measurement has long been emphasized by CNSs and effecting nurse-sensitive and other outcomes has been the hallmark of CNS success. This project shows how CNS faculty can bridge the gap between education and the real world of the CNS in developing outcomes-based programs. Background/Design: The NACNS Statement on Clinical Nurse Specialist Practice and Education emphasizes the importance of developing CNS competencies for evaluating patient, CNS practice, and nurse-sensitive outcomes. Therefore, to adequately prepare students for CNS practice, educational programs must provide foundational experiences in planning and evaluating programs for nurse-sensitive outcomes. Methods: Prerequisite knowledge and skills for developing an outcomes project and their introduction throughout the CNS curriculum in core and clinical courses are identified. Using exemplars of completed student projects in such areas as medication reconciliation, heart failure guideline implementation, and palliative care, this poster details the processes used and the outcomes achieved by students in their capstone practicum experience. The four stages involved in planning and executing the projects, including barriers and facilitators, are outlined. Peer, faculty, and self-evaluation methods for the project are presented. Findings: Seven students completed projects in May 2006. Students, preceptors, and faculty members returned overall positive evaluations of the educational and clinical importance of the learning experience. Areas for improvement included the need for earlier development of organizational assessment skills and for a longer time frame to fully implement and evaluate the project. Several of the projects have been incorporated as ongoing initiatives in the clinical agencies, in some cases with students continuing as ongoing consultants. Conclusions: The course outcomes project is an effective tool for bridging the gap between CNS education and practice in developing student competency for the CNS role. Implications for Practice: The project highlighted the importance of core content in advanced practice nursing education, including research, ethics, culture, and health care policy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:24Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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