2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164178
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CNS Leadership: Saving Lives with a Rapid Response Team
Author(s):
Curl, Peggy; Oberg, Mary
Author Details:
Peggy Curl, MSN, ARNP, WOCN, Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee Mission, Kansas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Mary Oberg, MN, ARNP BC, CHTP
Abstract:
Purpose: 1. Identify steps used to develop a Rapid Response Team. 2. Describe CNS role in development, implementation, and evaluation of a Rapid Response Team. Significance: Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) has recommended the Rapid Response Team as one of six initiatives nationwide to enhance safety and outcomes of patients failing outside of ICU. Studies show that early warning signs of physiological deterioration leading to cardiopulmonary arrests are not always recognized by staff nurses. Background/Design: Rapid Response Teams have been very successful in Australia and United Kingdom for many years. Teams are gaining momentum in America. Methods: CNS's were challenged as leaders to develop, implement, and evaluate a multi-disciplinary Rapid Response Team. The steps followed in the creation of a comprehensive Rapid Response Team initiative were: Reviewed literature; Engaged stakeholders; Identified patient condition criteria; Selected system-wide patient and professional development outcome metrics; Collected baseline data; Designed process for ongoing outcome data analysis and program refinement; Developed Rapid Response Team policy; Modified supporting protocols and standing orders; Implemented house-wide education and marketing. Special emphasis was placed on the critical role of communication. The design included a process for post event debriefing with team and staff nurses and the utilization of a customized Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation (SBAR) communication format. Findings: Three recommended IHI outcomes were measured: percent of codes outside of ICU, codes per 1000 discharges, and utilization of Rapid Response Team. Survival rate at end of codes was also selected. Ongoing professional development of staff was monitored. Conclusions: During the first two weeks of implementation, the Rapid Response Team responded to twelve calls, transferred two patients to ICU, and sent one back to surgery. No codes were called. Staff nurses reported appreciation for clinical assessment support at the bedside. Implications for Practice: The system and outcome focus of CNS's are vital resources for development, implementation, and evaluation of Rapid Response Teams. The involvement of the CNS in the professional development of staff nurses is producing enhanced assessment skills at the bedside in addition to saving lives.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCNS Leadership: Saving Lives with a Rapid Response Teamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCurl, Peggyen_US
dc.contributor.authorOberg, Maryen_US
dc.author.detailsPeggy Curl, MSN, ARNP, WOCN, Shawnee Mission Medical Center, Shawnee Mission, Kansas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Mary Oberg, MN, ARNP BC, CHTPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164178-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: 1. Identify steps used to develop a Rapid Response Team. 2. Describe CNS role in development, implementation, and evaluation of a Rapid Response Team. Significance: Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) has recommended the Rapid Response Team as one of six initiatives nationwide to enhance safety and outcomes of patients failing outside of ICU. Studies show that early warning signs of physiological deterioration leading to cardiopulmonary arrests are not always recognized by staff nurses. Background/Design: Rapid Response Teams have been very successful in Australia and United Kingdom for many years. Teams are gaining momentum in America. Methods: CNS's were challenged as leaders to develop, implement, and evaluate a multi-disciplinary Rapid Response Team. The steps followed in the creation of a comprehensive Rapid Response Team initiative were: Reviewed literature; Engaged stakeholders; Identified patient condition criteria; Selected system-wide patient and professional development outcome metrics; Collected baseline data; Designed process for ongoing outcome data analysis and program refinement; Developed Rapid Response Team policy; Modified supporting protocols and standing orders; Implemented house-wide education and marketing. Special emphasis was placed on the critical role of communication. The design included a process for post event debriefing with team and staff nurses and the utilization of a customized Situation, Background, Assessment, and Recommendation (SBAR) communication format. Findings: Three recommended IHI outcomes were measured: percent of codes outside of ICU, codes per 1000 discharges, and utilization of Rapid Response Team. Survival rate at end of codes was also selected. Ongoing professional development of staff was monitored. Conclusions: During the first two weeks of implementation, the Rapid Response Team responded to twelve calls, transferred two patients to ICU, and sent one back to surgery. No codes were called. Staff nurses reported appreciation for clinical assessment support at the bedside. Implications for Practice: The system and outcome focus of CNS's are vital resources for development, implementation, and evaluation of Rapid Response Teams. The involvement of the CNS in the professional development of staff nurses is producing enhanced assessment skills at the bedside in addition to saving lives.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:29Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:29Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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