2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164179
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Patient Safety by Standardizing Hand-Off Communications
Author(s):
Danis, Diane; Klinkner, Gwen; Malec, Ann; Rees, Susan
Author Details:
Diane Danis, MS, RN, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Gwen Klinkner, MS, RN, APRN, BC-ADM, CDE; Ann Malec, MS, RN, ACNP; Susan Rees, MS, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this clinical improvement project is two-fold: 1) to implement a standardized approach to hand-off communications about patients as they move throughout the hospital 2) to improve compliance in using the newly developed hand-off communications form. Significance: Given the complexity of healthcare environments today, staff is challenged to communicate effectively about patients in order to ensure safety. One of the JCAHO 2006 National Patient Safety Goals requires a standardized approach to hand-off communications.' given the number of sentinel events that have been attributed to a lack of communication. Background/Design: A root-cause analysis was initially completed to look at the management of insulin infusions for patients who move throughout the hospital for tests and procedures. A lack of standardized communication was identified as a root cause of issues surrounding the care and safety of these patients. It was also clear that all patients, not just those with insulin infusions, would benefit from a standardized approach to communication. Methods: A CNS-led team designed a hand-off form to standardize communication about any patient traveling off of the inpatient units for tests or procedures. After a four-month pilot on three units, the form was implemented to be used hospital-wide. Forms are collected centrally for compliance data analysis. Findings: Initial findings indicate that staff use the hand-off form on a regular basis and have increased their communication about patients. Conclusions: Staff have become more aware of the gaps in communication and the difficulties of communicating within such a complex environment. Dialogue has increased about information that is not being communicated about patients. The volume of forms used reflects an added workload for staff completing the forms as well as for those responsible for data entry. Implications for Practice: One of the 2006 National Patient Safety Goals requires that hand-off communications must be communicated in a standardized way. Although a written form imposes more work for those completing it and for those doing data entry, it is more efficient and therefore, completed more often than communications given in person or by phone. An electronic version of the form is a future goal.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Patient Safety by Standardizing Hand-Off Communicationsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDanis, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorKlinkner, Gwenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMalec, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorRees, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsDiane Danis, MS, RN, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Gwen Klinkner, MS, RN, APRN, BC-ADM, CDE; Ann Malec, MS, RN, ACNP; Susan Rees, MS, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164179-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this clinical improvement project is two-fold: 1) to implement a standardized approach to hand-off communications about patients as they move throughout the hospital 2) to improve compliance in using the newly developed hand-off communications form. Significance: Given the complexity of healthcare environments today, staff is challenged to communicate effectively about patients in order to ensure safety. One of the JCAHO 2006 National Patient Safety Goals requires a standardized approach to hand-off communications.' given the number of sentinel events that have been attributed to a lack of communication. Background/Design: A root-cause analysis was initially completed to look at the management of insulin infusions for patients who move throughout the hospital for tests and procedures. A lack of standardized communication was identified as a root cause of issues surrounding the care and safety of these patients. It was also clear that all patients, not just those with insulin infusions, would benefit from a standardized approach to communication. Methods: A CNS-led team designed a hand-off form to standardize communication about any patient traveling off of the inpatient units for tests or procedures. After a four-month pilot on three units, the form was implemented to be used hospital-wide. Forms are collected centrally for compliance data analysis. Findings: Initial findings indicate that staff use the hand-off form on a regular basis and have increased their communication about patients. Conclusions: Staff have become more aware of the gaps in communication and the difficulties of communicating within such a complex environment. Dialogue has increased about information that is not being communicated about patients. The volume of forms used reflects an added workload for staff completing the forms as well as for those responsible for data entry. Implications for Practice: One of the 2006 National Patient Safety Goals requires that hand-off communications must be communicated in a standardized way. Although a written form imposes more work for those completing it and for those doing data entry, it is more efficient and therefore, completed more often than communications given in person or by phone. An electronic version of the form is a future goal.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:30Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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