2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164185
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Patient Handoffs: More than a Buzz Word: Changing a Culture
Author(s):
Earhart, Ann; Mangino, Ruthie R.
Author Details:
Ann Earhart, MSN, CRNI, Banner Desert Medical Center, Mesa, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Ruthie R. Mangino, MSN, APRN, BC
Abstract:
Purpose: Develop a process for safe handoff of care to meet the National Patient Safety Goals. Significance: Lack of a standardization process for communication among healthcare providers leads to untoward patient outcomes. Background/Design: Joint Commission of Accreditation of Healthcare Organization regulations require a standardized hand-off communication between healthcare providers. Lack of processes and communication related to patient care lead the CNSs to put together a task force to further investigate concerns regarding patient outcomes. Methods: A task force, led by the CNSs, was formed and the steps of the nursing process were utilized in changing the organization's culture related to patient safety. The need for a change in handoff of care was identified via sentinel events, staff and physician complaints, and occurrence reports. The CNSs invited staff to describe current practice of patient transfers within the medical center. A current review of the literature was presented and gaps in the current practice were identified. A plan and a policy were developed and a form trialed in various areas of patient care. Changes were identified and made to the process and the form. Currently, the process and form are being further evaluated and revised. Outcomes will be presented at the session. Findings: Standardized definition of transfer of care, a documentation tool to use for when transfer of care occurs, and a policy outlining the practice. Conclusions: Documentation is not required for every time the patient leaves the patient care unit. CNSs were the best group to lead this culture change. Going through the process of looking at current practice and matching it to national standard and regulatory requirements makes for patient safer care by identifying where we could improve communication among caregivers. Implications for Practice: "Report called" and "report received" are inadequate documentation for patient transfer of care. A consistent communication tool is essential in safe patient hand-offs. Staff involvement in an organization culture is a future goal.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePatient Handoffs: More than a Buzz Word: Changing a Cultureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEarhart, Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorMangino, Ruthie R.en_US
dc.author.detailsAnn Earhart, MSN, CRNI, Banner Desert Medical Center, Mesa, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Ruthie R. Mangino, MSN, APRN, BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164185-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Develop a process for safe handoff of care to meet the National Patient Safety Goals. Significance: Lack of a standardization process for communication among healthcare providers leads to untoward patient outcomes. Background/Design: Joint Commission of Accreditation of Healthcare Organization regulations require a standardized hand-off communication between healthcare providers. Lack of processes and communication related to patient care lead the CNSs to put together a task force to further investigate concerns regarding patient outcomes. Methods: A task force, led by the CNSs, was formed and the steps of the nursing process were utilized in changing the organization's culture related to patient safety. The need for a change in handoff of care was identified via sentinel events, staff and physician complaints, and occurrence reports. The CNSs invited staff to describe current practice of patient transfers within the medical center. A current review of the literature was presented and gaps in the current practice were identified. A plan and a policy were developed and a form trialed in various areas of patient care. Changes were identified and made to the process and the form. Currently, the process and form are being further evaluated and revised. Outcomes will be presented at the session. Findings: Standardized definition of transfer of care, a documentation tool to use for when transfer of care occurs, and a policy outlining the practice. Conclusions: Documentation is not required for every time the patient leaves the patient care unit. CNSs were the best group to lead this culture change. Going through the process of looking at current practice and matching it to national standard and regulatory requirements makes for patient safer care by identifying where we could improve communication among caregivers. Implications for Practice: "Report called" and "report received" are inadequate documentation for patient transfer of care. A consistent communication tool is essential in safe patient hand-offs. Staff involvement in an organization culture is a future goal.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:37Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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