2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164192
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Unit Based Research to Improve Patient Safety
Author(s):
Garolis, Salomeja; Halvorsen, Lisa; Hays, Victoria
Author Details:
Salomeja Garolis, MSN, RN, CNS, Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Lisa Halvorsen, PhD, RN, CS, CCRN; Victoria Hays, MN, RN, CNS
Abstract:
Purpose: Nurse leaders at our tertiary care facility developed a strategic plan to advance nursing practice through the implementation of Chulay's unit based research (UBR) program. In this model, bedside nurses are supported to ask questions about their practice and to conduct research studies as a method of improving patient care. Significance: The critical elements of the UBR model include: 1) active nurse involvement, and ownership of the research projects; 2) group research projects, rather than individual projects; 3) a research mentor who guides the UBR teams through the research process; and 4) research projects that focus on important clinical practice issues. Background/Design: Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS) serve as research mentors for UBR teams in their area of clinical expertise. Using classical group facilitation skills, the CNS assists a group of unit nurses to identify common and important patient care issues or problems. Methods: The mentors assist the UBR team to develop a research protocol, navigate IRB, complete data collection, analyze study data, and report their findings to internal and external audiences. Since most clinicians are not experienced researchers, the mentor's role is to accompany the UBR team on their research journey and to assure that ownership of the research project remains vested with the team. Findings: Of critical importance is the ability of the CNS to adapt research methods used when conducting academic research projects so nurses employed in acute care are successful in completing research. Chulay's development of CNS knowledge and skills in guiding UBR teams on their research journey is a major focus of this UBR program. 8 units are involved in the UBR model. Four have received IRB approval for their protocols and are collecting data. Conclusions: Nurses in UBR projects are: 1) expanding communication, writing and clinical inquiry skills; 2) increasing clinical knowledge; 3) taking responsibility for their practice; and 4) gain a high level of recognition for their research efforts. Implications for Practice: The UBR model can be adapted in any acute care setting with adequate research mentor support. One UBR project will be presented in detail.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Unit Based Research to Improve Patient Safetyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGarolis, Salomejaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHalvorsen, Lisaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHays, Victoriaen_US
dc.author.detailsSalomeja Garolis, MSN, RN, CNS, Providence Portland Medical Center, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Lisa Halvorsen, PhD, RN, CS, CCRN; Victoria Hays, MN, RN, CNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164192-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Nurse leaders at our tertiary care facility developed a strategic plan to advance nursing practice through the implementation of Chulay's unit based research (UBR) program. In this model, bedside nurses are supported to ask questions about their practice and to conduct research studies as a method of improving patient care. Significance: The critical elements of the UBR model include: 1) active nurse involvement, and ownership of the research projects; 2) group research projects, rather than individual projects; 3) a research mentor who guides the UBR teams through the research process; and 4) research projects that focus on important clinical practice issues. Background/Design: Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS) serve as research mentors for UBR teams in their area of clinical expertise. Using classical group facilitation skills, the CNS assists a group of unit nurses to identify common and important patient care issues or problems. Methods: The mentors assist the UBR team to develop a research protocol, navigate IRB, complete data collection, analyze study data, and report their findings to internal and external audiences. Since most clinicians are not experienced researchers, the mentor's role is to accompany the UBR team on their research journey and to assure that ownership of the research project remains vested with the team. Findings: Of critical importance is the ability of the CNS to adapt research methods used when conducting academic research projects so nurses employed in acute care are successful in completing research. Chulay's development of CNS knowledge and skills in guiding UBR teams on their research journey is a major focus of this UBR program. 8 units are involved in the UBR model. Four have received IRB approval for their protocols and are collecting data. Conclusions: Nurses in UBR projects are: 1) expanding communication, writing and clinical inquiry skills; 2) increasing clinical knowledge; 3) taking responsibility for their practice; and 4) gain a high level of recognition for their research efforts. Implications for Practice: The UBR model can be adapted in any acute care setting with adequate research mentor support. One UBR project will be presented in detail.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:45Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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