2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164194
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Oncology Collaborative Practice Model
Author(s):
Gibson, Denice
Author Details:
Denice Gibson, SN, RN, AOCNS, Banner Good Samaritan Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: Participants will acquire information on an innovative hospital practice model in oncology care and its impact on chemotherapy safety and employee satisfaction. Significance: Position statements from leading nursing and pharmacy organizations describe the shared vision for safe medication use in hospitals. Nursing and pharmacy, the nation's first and third largest health professions, respectively, have much in common. They have a shared concern for rational drug therapy, particularly its dispensing, administration, and monitoring. Moreover, members of both professional face a common constraint: Neither pharmacists nor nurses shave the authority to independently affect drug therapy. ASHP 2003. We developed a collaborative practice model to address these issues. Background/Design: Three disciplines are required ensure timely and accurate chemotherapy delivery to the patient in the hospital environment. Two of those, Nursing and Pharmacy, share many common interests for safe patient outcomes and contribute different perspectives to care. Collaboration provides timely care and enhances the knowledge base of each profession. Methods: A needs assessment tool was developed to analyze our system process for chemotherapy orders. An interdisciplinary team was formed for this analysis. Major elements included: action steps to increase organizational awareness of chemotherapy errors, computerized chemotherapy ordering system review, consultative interventions with office-based staff and data base development for error and near miss capture. Findings: The assessment identified areas for improvement in the chemotherapy process. A collaborative practice model was established by dedicating a pharmacy and advanced practice nurse FTE. Staff retention, patient satisfaction, physician satisfaction, decreased chemotherapy errors were areas to be measured. Conclusions: Collaboration provides benefits greater than the sum of its parts. Improved patient satisfaction, physician satisfaction, and staff retention were noted. Pharmacy and nursing staff appreciate the model and experience better job satisfaction and confidence in patient care with the addition of this resource. Implications for Practice: A novel collaborative role could benefit many institutions that deal with complex patient aggregates. The American Colleges of Nursing, The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the American Nurses Association, the American Organization of Nurse Executives and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacist describe the need for a shared vision for medication safety and improved medication use through better utilization of pharmacy and nursing work forces. We are achieving this through a collaborative practice model in the oncology setting.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOncology Collaborative Practice Modelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Deniceen_US
dc.author.detailsDenice Gibson, SN, RN, AOCNS, Banner Good Samaritan Hospital, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164194-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Participants will acquire information on an innovative hospital practice model in oncology care and its impact on chemotherapy safety and employee satisfaction. Significance: Position statements from leading nursing and pharmacy organizations describe the shared vision for safe medication use in hospitals. Nursing and pharmacy, the nation's first and third largest health professions, respectively, have much in common. They have a shared concern for rational drug therapy, particularly its dispensing, administration, and monitoring. Moreover, members of both professional face a common constraint: Neither pharmacists nor nurses shave the authority to independently affect drug therapy. ASHP 2003. We developed a collaborative practice model to address these issues. Background/Design: Three disciplines are required ensure timely and accurate chemotherapy delivery to the patient in the hospital environment. Two of those, Nursing and Pharmacy, share many common interests for safe patient outcomes and contribute different perspectives to care. Collaboration provides timely care and enhances the knowledge base of each profession. Methods: A needs assessment tool was developed to analyze our system process for chemotherapy orders. An interdisciplinary team was formed for this analysis. Major elements included: action steps to increase organizational awareness of chemotherapy errors, computerized chemotherapy ordering system review, consultative interventions with office-based staff and data base development for error and near miss capture. Findings: The assessment identified areas for improvement in the chemotherapy process. A collaborative practice model was established by dedicating a pharmacy and advanced practice nurse FTE. Staff retention, patient satisfaction, physician satisfaction, decreased chemotherapy errors were areas to be measured. Conclusions: Collaboration provides benefits greater than the sum of its parts. Improved patient satisfaction, physician satisfaction, and staff retention were noted. Pharmacy and nursing staff appreciate the model and experience better job satisfaction and confidence in patient care with the addition of this resource. Implications for Practice: A novel collaborative role could benefit many institutions that deal with complex patient aggregates. The American Colleges of Nursing, The American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the American Nurses Association, the American Organization of Nurse Executives and the American Society of Health-System Pharmacist describe the need for a shared vision for medication safety and improved medication use through better utilization of pharmacy and nursing work forces. We are achieving this through a collaborative practice model in the oncology setting.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:47Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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