2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164195
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Teaching Spirituality Content to Staff Nurses
Author(s):
Girard, Rachel
Author Details:
Rachel Girard, MS, MTS, RN, CDE, Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: This presentation describes a methodology for teaching spirituality content to staff nurses. Questions addressing key components of a spiritual assessment are identified. Strategies for the inclusion of spirituality and religious practices in the nursing plan of care are provided. Significance: Given that spiritual health is a component of holistic health, nursing professionals must address spirituality in order to provide quality patient and family-centered care. Background/Design: Very few baccalaureate programs adequately prepare nurses to focus on this dimension (Lemmer, 2002) and the topic is rarely covered in any depth by most nursing textbooks (McEwen, 2004). This lack of professional preparation hampers the delivery of quality care. It also has implications which make adherence to JCAHO practice mandates quite challenging. Methods: This presentation describes how a Diabetes Nurse Specialist with a graduate degree in theology has introduced the topic of spirituality and spiritual care to nurses at a large, tertiary care hospital. The differentiation between spirituality and religion is emphasized due to the facility's non-denominational status. Targeted questions that address the various components of spiritual assessment (hope, purpose, beliefs and practices) are provided. The program encourages staff to consider illness as a soul event, one of life's 'marking moments'. Various meanings attributed to a chronic illness diagnosis are discussed. Spiritual tools drawn from different cultures and religions are described. Findings: Participants learn strategies for providing holistic patient and family-centered care. By introducing the concept of spiritual assessment, staff are also given an opportunity to reflect on their own spiritual journey. The importance of spiritual self-care is emphasized, especially its potential impact on professional resiliency. Conclusions: Staff evaluations have been extremely positive. While the program was initially developed as a continuing education offering, plans are now in place to include it as part of the graduate nurse orientation. A future educational offering on the spirituality of Florence Nightingale is being considered. Implications for Practice: As societal health needs continue to focus on various chronic illnesses, nurses must explore ways to assist patients to 'live well' with these conditions. Attention to the spiritual needs of patients is an important key to this success.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleTeaching Spirituality Content to Staff Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGirard, Rachelen_US
dc.author.detailsRachel Girard, MS, MTS, RN, CDE, Maine Medical Center, Portland, Maine, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164195-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This presentation describes a methodology for teaching spirituality content to staff nurses. Questions addressing key components of a spiritual assessment are identified. Strategies for the inclusion of spirituality and religious practices in the nursing plan of care are provided. Significance: Given that spiritual health is a component of holistic health, nursing professionals must address spirituality in order to provide quality patient and family-centered care. Background/Design: Very few baccalaureate programs adequately prepare nurses to focus on this dimension (Lemmer, 2002) and the topic is rarely covered in any depth by most nursing textbooks (McEwen, 2004). This lack of professional preparation hampers the delivery of quality care. It also has implications which make adherence to JCAHO practice mandates quite challenging. Methods: This presentation describes how a Diabetes Nurse Specialist with a graduate degree in theology has introduced the topic of spirituality and spiritual care to nurses at a large, tertiary care hospital. The differentiation between spirituality and religion is emphasized due to the facility's non-denominational status. Targeted questions that address the various components of spiritual assessment (hope, purpose, beliefs and practices) are provided. The program encourages staff to consider illness as a soul event, one of life's 'marking moments'. Various meanings attributed to a chronic illness diagnosis are discussed. Spiritual tools drawn from different cultures and religions are described. Findings: Participants learn strategies for providing holistic patient and family-centered care. By introducing the concept of spiritual assessment, staff are also given an opportunity to reflect on their own spiritual journey. The importance of spiritual self-care is emphasized, especially its potential impact on professional resiliency. Conclusions: Staff evaluations have been extremely positive. While the program was initially developed as a continuing education offering, plans are now in place to include it as part of the graduate nurse orientation. A future educational offering on the spirituality of Florence Nightingale is being considered. Implications for Practice: As societal health needs continue to focus on various chronic illnesses, nurses must explore ways to assist patients to 'live well' with these conditions. Attention to the spiritual needs of patients is an important key to this success.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:48Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:48Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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