The Effect of Post Fall Assessment by an Advanced Practice Nurse on Inpatient Repeat Fall Rates

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164200
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effect of Post Fall Assessment by an Advanced Practice Nurse on Inpatient Repeat Fall Rates
Author(s):
Hatfield, Barbara
Author Details:
Barbara Hatfield, MS, RN, OCN, ACRN, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to determine if post fall assessment and interventions recommended by an Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) are associated with a decrease in the repeat fall rate. Significance: Patient falls are one of the most common adverse events that occur in acute care hospitals. While assessment of high risk factors can decrease the overall fall rate, it seems not to have an impact on repeat falls. Background/Design: A review of inpatient and rehabilitation patient falls over a three-month period at an acute care hospital revealed that between 18%-49% of patients had fallen more than once during the hospitalization. Methods: All acute care patients were assigned to an advanced practice nurse for a post fall assessment utilizing a document developed by the project team. All participants received advanced education on patient falls that emphasized risk factors for falls, fall prevention/protection interventions, and physical and environmental post fall assessment. Items reviewed included demographic information, location of the fall, and patient activity at the time of the fall, intrinsic and extrinsic contributing factors and medications. Findings and recommendations were discussed with the clinical nurse caring for the patient. Findings: One hundred and sixty-one patient falls were assessed. The repeat fall rate of patients reviewed by APNs was ten percent for the first six months and in the next three months decreasing to zero percent of repeat falls for the patients assessed by the APN showing a statistical significance. Conclusions: Assessment by an advanced practice nurse of a fall patient in an acute care setting can decrease the repeat fall rate. Implications for Practice: Analysis of the APN recommendations and the characteristics of the patients who fall twice is being conducted to evaluate the current fall risk assessment and prevention program. One trend seen is the time between the initial fall and the repeat fall. Using Clinical Nurse Specialists and other advanced practice nurses can influence patient safety.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effect of Post Fall Assessment by an Advanced Practice Nurse on Inpatient Repeat Fall Ratesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHatfield, Barbaraen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Hatfield, MS, RN, OCN, ACRN, Tampa General Hospital, Tampa, Florida, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164200-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this project was to determine if post fall assessment and interventions recommended by an Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) are associated with a decrease in the repeat fall rate. Significance: Patient falls are one of the most common adverse events that occur in acute care hospitals. While assessment of high risk factors can decrease the overall fall rate, it seems not to have an impact on repeat falls. Background/Design: A review of inpatient and rehabilitation patient falls over a three-month period at an acute care hospital revealed that between 18%-49% of patients had fallen more than once during the hospitalization. Methods: All acute care patients were assigned to an advanced practice nurse for a post fall assessment utilizing a document developed by the project team. All participants received advanced education on patient falls that emphasized risk factors for falls, fall prevention/protection interventions, and physical and environmental post fall assessment. Items reviewed included demographic information, location of the fall, and patient activity at the time of the fall, intrinsic and extrinsic contributing factors and medications. Findings and recommendations were discussed with the clinical nurse caring for the patient. Findings: One hundred and sixty-one patient falls were assessed. The repeat fall rate of patients reviewed by APNs was ten percent for the first six months and in the next three months decreasing to zero percent of repeat falls for the patients assessed by the APN showing a statistical significance. Conclusions: Assessment by an advanced practice nurse of a fall patient in an acute care setting can decrease the repeat fall rate. Implications for Practice: Analysis of the APN recommendations and the characteristics of the patients who fall twice is being conducted to evaluate the current fall risk assessment and prevention program. One trend seen is the time between the initial fall and the repeat fall. Using Clinical Nurse Specialists and other advanced practice nurses can influence patient safety.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:54Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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