2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164202
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Ethics, Nurses and the ICU: A Four Part Series
Author(s):
Hill, Kathleen M.; Wocial, Lucia
Author Details:
Kathleen M. Hill, MSN, RN, CCNS-CSC, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Lucia Wocial, PhD, CCNS
Abstract:
Purpose: This session will review the content of a CNS led intervention in an ICU. This program will provide an overview of the content for this four-part series, including suggestions for implementation in other organizations. Significance: The culture of the ICU is first and foremost about saving people's lives under challenging situations. The overwhelming presence of technology and the often miraculous recoveries we see are offset by those times when the burden of survival is more than some patients or families can bear. The culture of many ICUs include an unspoken taboo against considering the possibility that a patient may not survive, or will survive with devastating consequences inconsistent with his or her values and preferences. Background/Design: Our five cardiac surgery ICUs with a worldwide referral base provide abundant opportunity for nurses to encounter challenging ethical patient care situations. Bedside caregivers identified a need for clinically relevant information and skill building regarding their ability to cope with situations where patients' response to surgery was not as hoped. Methods: The CNS for the ICUs, the medical director, and a CNS with expertise in ethics collaborated to develop a four-part series for nursing and medical staff to address the issues encountered in the ICU setting. The series covered the topics of role definition, moral distress, legal issues, and offered an opportunity for practicing the skills needed to communicate with patients and families on these difficult topics. Findings: Attendance for the programs was less than anticipated, however, we have seen the beginnings of culture change as evidenced by how often the CNS is approached regarding involvement in end-of-life discussions, and in physician orders regarding DNR details. Conclusions: Culture change is slow; one nurse, one patient at a time. Implications for Practice: Collaboration with physicians and colleagues with expertise in other areas can have a positive impact on changing the culture of a unit.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEthics, Nurses and the ICU: A Four Part Seriesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHill, Kathleen M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWocial, Luciaen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen M. Hill, MSN, RN, CCNS-CSC, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Lucia Wocial, PhD, CCNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164202-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This session will review the content of a CNS led intervention in an ICU. This program will provide an overview of the content for this four-part series, including suggestions for implementation in other organizations. Significance: The culture of the ICU is first and foremost about saving people's lives under challenging situations. The overwhelming presence of technology and the often miraculous recoveries we see are offset by those times when the burden of survival is more than some patients or families can bear. The culture of many ICUs include an unspoken taboo against considering the possibility that a patient may not survive, or will survive with devastating consequences inconsistent with his or her values and preferences. Background/Design: Our five cardiac surgery ICUs with a worldwide referral base provide abundant opportunity for nurses to encounter challenging ethical patient care situations. Bedside caregivers identified a need for clinically relevant information and skill building regarding their ability to cope with situations where patients' response to surgery was not as hoped. Methods: The CNS for the ICUs, the medical director, and a CNS with expertise in ethics collaborated to develop a four-part series for nursing and medical staff to address the issues encountered in the ICU setting. The series covered the topics of role definition, moral distress, legal issues, and offered an opportunity for practicing the skills needed to communicate with patients and families on these difficult topics. Findings: Attendance for the programs was less than anticipated, however, we have seen the beginnings of culture change as evidenced by how often the CNS is approached regarding involvement in end-of-life discussions, and in physician orders regarding DNR details. Conclusions: Culture change is slow; one nurse, one patient at a time. Implications for Practice: Collaboration with physicians and colleagues with expertise in other areas can have a positive impact on changing the culture of a unit.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:43:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:43:56Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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