4.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164206
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing Falls through RN Rounding
Author(s):
Johnson, Linda; Topham, Debra
Author Details:
Linda Johnson, BSN, RN, CRRN, Regions Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Debra Topham, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement a cost-effective fall reduction program. Significance: Falls accounted for approximately 4.6% of the sentinel events reviewed by the Joint Commission through the end of 2003. Patient falls contribute significantly to patient morbidity, mortality, increased lengths of stay, and hospitalization costs. Background/Design: In 2005, Regions Hospital spent $1.5 million in safety assistants to keep their patients safe from falls. Despite this cost, patients still fell at a rate above the national average. Methods: To reduce the fall rate, the Rehabilitation unit instituted frequent RN rounding on patients. A RN rounded on the patient on even hours and a PCA rounded on the patients on the odd hours. During the rounds, the RN or PCA intervened as appropriate using 4 P's to guide their interactions. The 4 P's included - Pain, Potty, Position, and Perception. Since more than 60% of falls could be attributed to patients trying to go to the bathroom, the primary purpose of frequent rounding was to toilet patients to prevent unassisted attempts at going to the bathroom. Since reassessing pain and changing patient's position to prevent skin breakdown were also part of safety goals, RNs included these interventions during their rounds. The fourth P, Perception, was added because so many patients with altered mental state had greater safety risks. Findings: The Rehabilitation Unit went from having the highest fall rate to the lowest fall rate in the hospital. Additionally, the Unit eliminated use of safety assistants, going from the unit with the highest utilization of safety assistants to the lowest utilization of safety assistants. RN rounding was then implemented house-wide. Recent NDNQI data shows the lowest fall rate in two years. Conclusions: RN rounding and other fall reduction interventions, when consistently and systematically implemented can cost-effectively reduce patient falls. Implications for Practice: RN rounding with corresponding interventions is effective in decreasing hospitalized patient fall rates in a cost effective manner. One of the keys to success is for the RN to intervene at the time of rounds. Another key intervention is to make sure RNs round at least every two hours.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing Falls through RN Roundingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorTopham, Debraen_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Johnson, BSN, RN, CRRN, Regions Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Debra Topham, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164206-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this project was to implement a cost-effective fall reduction program. Significance: Falls accounted for approximately 4.6% of the sentinel events reviewed by the Joint Commission through the end of 2003. Patient falls contribute significantly to patient morbidity, mortality, increased lengths of stay, and hospitalization costs. Background/Design: In 2005, Regions Hospital spent $1.5 million in safety assistants to keep their patients safe from falls. Despite this cost, patients still fell at a rate above the national average. Methods: To reduce the fall rate, the Rehabilitation unit instituted frequent RN rounding on patients. A RN rounded on the patient on even hours and a PCA rounded on the patients on the odd hours. During the rounds, the RN or PCA intervened as appropriate using 4 P's to guide their interactions. The 4 P's included - Pain, Potty, Position, and Perception. Since more than 60% of falls could be attributed to patients trying to go to the bathroom, the primary purpose of frequent rounding was to toilet patients to prevent unassisted attempts at going to the bathroom. Since reassessing pain and changing patient's position to prevent skin breakdown were also part of safety goals, RNs included these interventions during their rounds. The fourth P, Perception, was added because so many patients with altered mental state had greater safety risks. Findings: The Rehabilitation Unit went from having the highest fall rate to the lowest fall rate in the hospital. Additionally, the Unit eliminated use of safety assistants, going from the unit with the highest utilization of safety assistants to the lowest utilization of safety assistants. RN rounding was then implemented house-wide. Recent NDNQI data shows the lowest fall rate in two years. Conclusions: RN rounding and other fall reduction interventions, when consistently and systematically implemented can cost-effectively reduce patient falls. Implications for Practice: RN rounding with corresponding interventions is effective in decreasing hospitalized patient fall rates in a cost effective manner. One of the keys to success is for the RN to intervene at the time of rounds. Another key intervention is to make sure RNs round at least every two hours.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:00Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:00Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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