2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164216
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Weighing in to Increase Heart Failure Compliance
Author(s):
Pound, Debra
Author Details:
Debra Pound, MS, APRN, BC, Integris Health, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: This project objective is a reduction in heart failure readmissions and ED encounters through education and initiation of appropriate self-care behaviors during hospitalization. A secondary purpose is to increase accuracy of daily weights for heart failure patients and consequently reducing length of stay. Significance: Heart failure is the only cardiac disease with increasing incidence and prevalence. It represents 15% of all Medicare hospitalizations and accounts for 40% of all Medicare dollars. In 2004, total direct costs for heart failure patients were $26.7 billion, with an additional $28.8 billion in indirect costs. Heart failure is also lethal accounting for more than 266,000 deaths annually. The 5-year mortality rate approaches 50%, with 70% of women and 80% of men dying within 8 years of diagnosis. Nationally, 23% of heart failure patients are readmitted within 30 days of discharge from admission for decompensation. Our facility rate is approximately 20.3% with estimated un-reimbursed costs of more than $500,000 annually. Background/Design: Heart failure is the only cardiac disease with increasing incidence and prevalence. It represents 15% of all Medicare hospitalizations and accounts for 40% of all Medicare dollars. In 2004, total direct costs for heart failure patients were $26.7 billion, with an additional $28.8 billion in direct costs. Heart failure is also lethal accounting for more than 266,000 deaths annually. The 5-year mortality rate approaches 50%, with 70% of women and 80% of men dying within 8 years of diagnosis. Nationally, 23% of heart failure patients are readmitted within 30 days of discharge from admission for decompensation. Our facility rate is approximately 20.3% with estimated un-reimbursed costs of more than $500,000 annually. Methods: The project is being piloted on the PCCU. Patients are screened for heart failure as the primary diagnosis, intact cognitive status and the ability to stand to weigh. If all criteria are met, the patient is issued a solar digital scale for use for daily weights while admitted and for use at home after discharge; patients are encouraged to take responsibility for obtaining their own daily weight and reporting it to nursing staff. At the time of scale distribution, heart failure self-care education is conducted emphasizing the importance/rationale for daily weights. Findings: The project has been underway for nine weeks; 14 scales have been distributed. Four recipients agreed to obtain their own daily weight. There have been three readmissions: 1) Pneumonia (readmit < 24 hrs) 2) Increased edema, chest pain - stents placed 3) Heart failure exacerbation (readmit < 2weeks) There have been no ED encounters among scale recipients. Conclusions: The outcomes confirm the importance of patient education in behavior compliance and symptom monitoring when living with heart failure.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWeighing in to Increase Heart Failure Complianceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPound, Debraen_US
dc.author.detailsDebra Pound, MS, APRN, BC, Integris Health, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164216-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This project objective is a reduction in heart failure readmissions and ED encounters through education and initiation of appropriate self-care behaviors during hospitalization. A secondary purpose is to increase accuracy of daily weights for heart failure patients and consequently reducing length of stay. Significance: Heart failure is the only cardiac disease with increasing incidence and prevalence. It represents 15% of all Medicare hospitalizations and accounts for 40% of all Medicare dollars. In 2004, total direct costs for heart failure patients were $26.7 billion, with an additional $28.8 billion in indirect costs. Heart failure is also lethal accounting for more than 266,000 deaths annually. The 5-year mortality rate approaches 50%, with 70% of women and 80% of men dying within 8 years of diagnosis. Nationally, 23% of heart failure patients are readmitted within 30 days of discharge from admission for decompensation. Our facility rate is approximately 20.3% with estimated un-reimbursed costs of more than $500,000 annually. Background/Design: Heart failure is the only cardiac disease with increasing incidence and prevalence. It represents 15% of all Medicare hospitalizations and accounts for 40% of all Medicare dollars. In 2004, total direct costs for heart failure patients were $26.7 billion, with an additional $28.8 billion in direct costs. Heart failure is also lethal accounting for more than 266,000 deaths annually. The 5-year mortality rate approaches 50%, with 70% of women and 80% of men dying within 8 years of diagnosis. Nationally, 23% of heart failure patients are readmitted within 30 days of discharge from admission for decompensation. Our facility rate is approximately 20.3% with estimated un-reimbursed costs of more than $500,000 annually. Methods: The project is being piloted on the PCCU. Patients are screened for heart failure as the primary diagnosis, intact cognitive status and the ability to stand to weigh. If all criteria are met, the patient is issued a solar digital scale for use for daily weights while admitted and for use at home after discharge; patients are encouraged to take responsibility for obtaining their own daily weight and reporting it to nursing staff. At the time of scale distribution, heart failure self-care education is conducted emphasizing the importance/rationale for daily weights. Findings: The project has been underway for nine weeks; 14 scales have been distributed. Four recipients agreed to obtain their own daily weight. There have been three readmissions: 1) Pneumonia (readmit < 24 hrs) 2) Increased edema, chest pain - stents placed 3) Heart failure exacerbation (readmit < 2weeks) There have been no ED encounters among scale recipients. Conclusions: The outcomes confirm the importance of patient education in behavior compliance and symptom monitoring when living with heart failure.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:12Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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