2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164217
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Most Effective Screening Question for Intimate Partner Violence
Author(s):
Robbins, Marni
Author Details:
Marni Robbins, MSN, ENP-C, CNS-C, My Healthy Access, Houston, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify what question registered nurses consider the most effective when screening for IPV in an emergency department setting. Significance: Two to four percent of female patients seen in hospital emergency departments (ED) throughout the United States are victims of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). Women are more likely to tell a stranger about their abuse than someone with whom they have an ongoing relationship, and direct questioning increases the likelihood of reporting by four-fold. Background/Design: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive survey. An 11 question survey instrument was distributed to 68 registered nurses who work in the ED at a non-teaching, Level 3 trauma center in Southwest Houston, Texas. Nurses were asked to rank order the questions. Methods: Questions were chosen based on a literature review which included items from the Abuse Assessment Screen that was created by the Nursing Research Consortium on Violence and Abuse. The questions ranged from broad ('Are you safe at home?') to specific ('Have you been hit, slapped, kicked, or punched by a significant other?'). Findings: A total of 25 surveys were returned for a response rate of 36.8%. Four surveys were unusable. The question ranked as the most effective was "Are you in a relationship with a person who physically hurts or threatens you?" with a mean rank of 3.16. This finding is consistent with the literature as victims do not generally perceive themselves as being 'beaten' and prefer the term 'physically hurt' when referring to their abuse. The question ranked the least effective was "Do you feel isolated by your partner?" with a mean rank of 8.47. Questions that ranked lowest used such terms as "isolated," "controlled," and "afraid." Conclusions: Emergency nurses have an important opportunity to identify victims of IPV and to intervene with recommendations for appropriate follow-up care. In addition to screening for IPV with effective questions, the emergency nurse may be able to open a dialogue with victims who may otherwise be reluctant to disclose their history. Implications for Practice: Consistency in screening with the most effective questions may help implement appropriate interventions and lessen the morbidity and mortality rates among victims of IPV throughout the United States.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Most Effective Screening Question for Intimate Partner Violenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Marnien_US
dc.author.detailsMarni Robbins, MSN, ENP-C, CNS-C, My Healthy Access, Houston, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164217-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to identify what question registered nurses consider the most effective when screening for IPV in an emergency department setting. Significance: Two to four percent of female patients seen in hospital emergency departments (ED) throughout the United States are victims of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). Women are more likely to tell a stranger about their abuse than someone with whom they have an ongoing relationship, and direct questioning increases the likelihood of reporting by four-fold. Background/Design: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive survey. An 11 question survey instrument was distributed to 68 registered nurses who work in the ED at a non-teaching, Level 3 trauma center in Southwest Houston, Texas. Nurses were asked to rank order the questions. Methods: Questions were chosen based on a literature review which included items from the Abuse Assessment Screen that was created by the Nursing Research Consortium on Violence and Abuse. The questions ranged from broad ('Are you safe at home?') to specific ('Have you been hit, slapped, kicked, or punched by a significant other?'). Findings: A total of 25 surveys were returned for a response rate of 36.8%. Four surveys were unusable. The question ranked as the most effective was "Are you in a relationship with a person who physically hurts or threatens you?" with a mean rank of 3.16. This finding is consistent with the literature as victims do not generally perceive themselves as being 'beaten' and prefer the term 'physically hurt' when referring to their abuse. The question ranked the least effective was "Do you feel isolated by your partner?" with a mean rank of 8.47. Questions that ranked lowest used such terms as "isolated," "controlled," and "afraid." Conclusions: Emergency nurses have an important opportunity to identify victims of IPV and to intervene with recommendations for appropriate follow-up care. In addition to screening for IPV with effective questions, the emergency nurse may be able to open a dialogue with victims who may otherwise be reluctant to disclose their history. Implications for Practice: Consistency in screening with the most effective questions may help implement appropriate interventions and lessen the morbidity and mortality rates among victims of IPV throughout the United States.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:13Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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