2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164219
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Newborn Scale Of Sepsis (SOS)
Author(s):
Rubarth, Lori
Author Details:
Lori Rubarth, PhD, RNC, NNP, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this research study was to estimate the reliability and validity of the Newborn Scale of Sepsis (SOS) to determine its usefulness for predicting and assessing newborns for sepsis. Significance: Sepsis is a devastating, life-threatening disease and a major problem for many newborns and premature infants. Early-onset sepsis appears in the first week of life and generally develops rapidly. When an infant begins to exhibit signs of sepsis, the nurse at the bedside uses clinical expertise to evaluate the seriousness of the infant's condition. Expertise is required to identify subtle signs of sepsis at an early stage in order to prevent newborn death or disability. A reliable and valid tool for early detection of neonatal sepsis would improve the chances of survival of newborns. Background/Design: This study was a prospective, methodological design used to test the psychometrics of a new criterion-referenced instrument. The sample consisted of 62 infants admitted to a transitional nursery or NICU with signs of sepsis or risk factors for sepsis. Methods: The infants were assessed using the 13-item Newborn Scale of Sepsis (SOS) which consisted of 5 laboratory tests and 8 clinical indicators of sepsis. The assessments were done hourly up to three total assessments. Findings: The 13-item Newborn Scale of Sepsis (SOS) had a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.65 and interrater reliability of 96.3%. The content validity index (CVI) for the entire scale was 0.77. A sensitivity of 93%, specificity of 47%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 29% with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 97% was identified. Conclusions: The relative high sensitivity, low specificity and low PPV indicated that the Newborn SOS, while its sensitivity was very good, its low specificity limited its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. It was concluded that the Newborn SOS can be used to assist novice nurses in developing pattern recognition of newborn sepsis. Implications for Practice: The Newborn SOS was developed to assist the novice nurse to assess for signs of sepsis and will give nurses a tool to assist with the assessment of sepsis, which could decrease the cost of hospital care and improve the chances of survival of the newborn.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNewborn Scale Of Sepsis (SOS)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorRubarth, Lorien_US
dc.author.detailsLori Rubarth, PhD, RNC, NNP, Creighton University, Omaha, Nebraska, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164219-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this research study was to estimate the reliability and validity of the Newborn Scale of Sepsis (SOS) to determine its usefulness for predicting and assessing newborns for sepsis. Significance: Sepsis is a devastating, life-threatening disease and a major problem for many newborns and premature infants. Early-onset sepsis appears in the first week of life and generally develops rapidly. When an infant begins to exhibit signs of sepsis, the nurse at the bedside uses clinical expertise to evaluate the seriousness of the infant's condition. Expertise is required to identify subtle signs of sepsis at an early stage in order to prevent newborn death or disability. A reliable and valid tool for early detection of neonatal sepsis would improve the chances of survival of newborns. Background/Design: This study was a prospective, methodological design used to test the psychometrics of a new criterion-referenced instrument. The sample consisted of 62 infants admitted to a transitional nursery or NICU with signs of sepsis or risk factors for sepsis. Methods: The infants were assessed using the 13-item Newborn Scale of Sepsis (SOS) which consisted of 5 laboratory tests and 8 clinical indicators of sepsis. The assessments were done hourly up to three total assessments. Findings: The 13-item Newborn Scale of Sepsis (SOS) had a Cronbach's alpha coefficient of 0.65 and interrater reliability of 96.3%. The content validity index (CVI) for the entire scale was 0.77. A sensitivity of 93%, specificity of 47%, positive predictive value (PPV) of 29% with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 97% was identified. Conclusions: The relative high sensitivity, low specificity and low PPV indicated that the Newborn SOS, while its sensitivity was very good, its low specificity limited its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. It was concluded that the Newborn SOS can be used to assist novice nurses in developing pattern recognition of newborn sepsis. Implications for Practice: The Newborn SOS was developed to assist the novice nurse to assess for signs of sepsis and will give nurses a tool to assist with the assessment of sepsis, which could decrease the cost of hospital care and improve the chances of survival of the newborn.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:15Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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