2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164220
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Getting to the Heart of Patient Education Needs
Author(s):
Schmitt, Emily
Author Details:
Emily Schmitt, MSN, RN, St. Joseph Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: Heart disease kills almost a million Americans a year, even though over half of these deaths are preventable. Men and women can differ in their reported symptoms of angina, which can lead to the misdiagnosis and mistreatment of heart disease. Enhanced gender specific cardiac patient education can provide substantial benefits towards the negative outcomes associated with heart disease. This could also assist patients in making informed decisions of their care, after consulting with their doctor, to improve their quality of life. Significance: Current research has shown that there is a disparity between women and men in the diagnosis, symptoms, treatment, and outcomes of CHD. Background/Design: Current literature recommends that counseling and patient education can provide substantial benefits towards the negative effects of CHD. Sufficient information and understanding of heart disease are needed to make informed decisions of care. Well-designed education programs regarding CHD can improve patient outcomes. Methods: The research was conducted by collaborating members of an interdisciplinary team including: cardiologists, cardiac rehabilitation RN's, and the Critical Care CNS. In a hospital setting, a questionnaire was developed (as data collection) and given to any patient with or at risk for heart disease, to evaluate the gender specific perceptions regarding many aspects of heart disease. Patients excluded were the patients too ill to approach, unable to read or understand English, or had underlying neurological deficits. Findings: After collecting 100 completed questionnaires, the data indicated that patients felt a need for improved gender specific patient education regarding their heart disease. A cardiac discharge teaching manual was designed and implemented specifically for both genders encompassing information regarding: the heart, heart disease, diagnostic and interventional procedures, medications, diet, home care, preventative measures, risk factors, recovery process, resources, stress management, exercise/activity, and other contributing factors such as diabetes, smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Conclusions: As CNSs, it is our responsibility to provide patients with the most current evidence-based information regarding their health. Implications for Practice: Strategies to implement the manual include: networking available resources, present evidence and motivation towards quality patient education, and use a data collection tool to evaluate the need for change at the facility chosen.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGetting to the Heart of Patient Education Needsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Emilyen_US
dc.author.detailsEmily Schmitt, MSN, RN, St. Joseph Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164220-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Heart disease kills almost a million Americans a year, even though over half of these deaths are preventable. Men and women can differ in their reported symptoms of angina, which can lead to the misdiagnosis and mistreatment of heart disease. Enhanced gender specific cardiac patient education can provide substantial benefits towards the negative outcomes associated with heart disease. This could also assist patients in making informed decisions of their care, after consulting with their doctor, to improve their quality of life. Significance: Current research has shown that there is a disparity between women and men in the diagnosis, symptoms, treatment, and outcomes of CHD. Background/Design: Current literature recommends that counseling and patient education can provide substantial benefits towards the negative effects of CHD. Sufficient information and understanding of heart disease are needed to make informed decisions of care. Well-designed education programs regarding CHD can improve patient outcomes. Methods: The research was conducted by collaborating members of an interdisciplinary team including: cardiologists, cardiac rehabilitation RN's, and the Critical Care CNS. In a hospital setting, a questionnaire was developed (as data collection) and given to any patient with or at risk for heart disease, to evaluate the gender specific perceptions regarding many aspects of heart disease. Patients excluded were the patients too ill to approach, unable to read or understand English, or had underlying neurological deficits. Findings: After collecting 100 completed questionnaires, the data indicated that patients felt a need for improved gender specific patient education regarding their heart disease. A cardiac discharge teaching manual was designed and implemented specifically for both genders encompassing information regarding: the heart, heart disease, diagnostic and interventional procedures, medications, diet, home care, preventative measures, risk factors, recovery process, resources, stress management, exercise/activity, and other contributing factors such as diabetes, smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Conclusions: As CNSs, it is our responsibility to provide patients with the most current evidence-based information regarding their health. Implications for Practice: Strategies to implement the manual include: networking available resources, present evidence and motivation towards quality patient education, and use a data collection tool to evaluate the need for change at the facility chosen.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:17Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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