1.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164223
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Safe Patient Handling of Immobile Medical Bariatric Patients
Author(s):
Topham, Debra
Author Details:
Debra Topham, PhD, RN, CNS, APRN, BC, Regions Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this project was to implement systematic program for staff to work with the immobile medical bariatric patient. Significance: When looking for resources on care of the bariatric patient, the literature is dominated by interventions appropriate only for the surgical bariatric patient. The immobile medical bariatric patient has complex care issues far different from the surgical bariatric patient. Background/Design: In 2005, Regions Hospital saw a significant increase in the immobile medical bariatric patient, with a resulting increase in staff injuries related to providing care for these patients. Most of these patients weighed more than 550 pounds. Additionally, these patients were placed in surgical bariatric beds, which resulted in a decrease in beds available for all surgical patients. Methods: The Lead CNS formed an interdisciplinary group of providers to address lifting, transfer, and transport needs of the immobile medical bariatric patient. The group was comprised of the CNS, Environmental Services, Director of Nursing Resources, Transportation Coordinator, Psychiatry, Physical Therapy, and Occupational Therapy. The team met to form a system for admission of the immobile medical bariatric patient that: 1) minimized the number of transfers the patient would incur during a hospitalization; 2) placed the patient on the correct unit; and 3) facilitated getting the proper bed set up for the patient's hospital stay. The team also developed a ManPower Team comprised of volunteers from environmental services and transport who would respond to nursing requests for assistance in providing care to the immobile medical bariatric patient. Findings: The ManPower team has been quite successful in getting assistance to the nursing staff in a timely manner. It is too early to tell if nurse injuries have been reduced. Outcomes will be reported at the CNS conference. Conclusions: Moving and transfers are just one of the needs of the immobile medical bariatric patient that is different from the surgical bariatric patient. Other differences include levels of motivation, discharge placement issues, and overlay of various personality/psychiatric disorders. Implications for Practice: With the increasing number of immobile medical bariatric patients, there is an increased need to address care issues of this growing patient population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSafe Patient Handling of Immobile Medical Bariatric Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTopham, Debraen_US
dc.author.detailsDebra Topham, PhD, RN, CNS, APRN, BC, Regions Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164223-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this project was to implement systematic program for staff to work with the immobile medical bariatric patient. Significance: When looking for resources on care of the bariatric patient, the literature is dominated by interventions appropriate only for the surgical bariatric patient. The immobile medical bariatric patient has complex care issues far different from the surgical bariatric patient. Background/Design: In 2005, Regions Hospital saw a significant increase in the immobile medical bariatric patient, with a resulting increase in staff injuries related to providing care for these patients. Most of these patients weighed more than 550 pounds. Additionally, these patients were placed in surgical bariatric beds, which resulted in a decrease in beds available for all surgical patients. Methods: The Lead CNS formed an interdisciplinary group of providers to address lifting, transfer, and transport needs of the immobile medical bariatric patient. The group was comprised of the CNS, Environmental Services, Director of Nursing Resources, Transportation Coordinator, Psychiatry, Physical Therapy, and Occupational Therapy. The team met to form a system for admission of the immobile medical bariatric patient that: 1) minimized the number of transfers the patient would incur during a hospitalization; 2) placed the patient on the correct unit; and 3) facilitated getting the proper bed set up for the patient's hospital stay. The team also developed a ManPower Team comprised of volunteers from environmental services and transport who would respond to nursing requests for assistance in providing care to the immobile medical bariatric patient. Findings: The ManPower team has been quite successful in getting assistance to the nursing staff in a timely manner. It is too early to tell if nurse injuries have been reduced. Outcomes will be reported at the CNS conference. Conclusions: Moving and transfers are just one of the needs of the immobile medical bariatric patient that is different from the surgical bariatric patient. Other differences include levels of motivation, discharge placement issues, and overlay of various personality/psychiatric disorders. Implications for Practice: With the increasing number of immobile medical bariatric patients, there is an increased need to address care issues of this growing patient population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:20Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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