Leveling the Playing Field: Bridging the Knowledge Gap between Two-Year & Four-Year Prepared Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164225
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Leveling the Playing Field: Bridging the Knowledge Gap between Two-Year & Four-Year Prepared Nurses
Author(s):
Withrow, TK
Author Details:
TK Withrow, MSN, MEd, RN, Banner Desert Medical Center, Mesa, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: An educational program was developed for a 36 bed medical surgical unit specializing in care of renal disease and diabetes in a large tertiary hospital in suburban Phoenix, Arizona. Through examination of the unit's DRGs by volume for 2005, specific coursework was developed to target high-volume disease processes to increase the knowledge base of all core nurses in the unit. This included an in-depth review of pathophysiology for selected disease processes as well as the typical disease course, diagnostic workup and pharmacological therapies. Examples of this coursework included gastrointestinal disorders, the immune system and infectious processes, renal disorders, and endocrine disorders including diabetes mellitus. Emphasis on critical thinking was supported through the use of case studies and course examinations with a minimum passing score. Significance: The goals of this program were several: first, to narrow the educational gap between graduates of two-year and four-year nursing programs. In this unit, diploma graduates are 14%, ADN graduates 46%, and BSN graduates 40% of the total RN staff. For relevancy, high volume DRG coded disorders from the unit were explored at the cellular level. Second, the program supported development of critical thinking skills by increasing understanding of disease process in order to better anticipate both typical disease course and recognition of deterioration or complications. Third, the professional responsibility of nursing was emphasized to understand medications' mechanisms of action and impact on particular disorders. Fourth, a consistent theme of exploration emphasized the use of research and evidence-based practices to maximize each patient's healing potential. Finally, considerable emphasis was placed on the emotional/psychosocial care of repeat admission populations such as end-stage renal disease. Caring behaviors and nursing interventions relevant to each group of disorders selected were discussed as part of the case study review. Background/Design: The unit described here had a history of high error reporting, poor evaluation of patient progress through the nurse documentation, and poor patient satisfaction scores obtained via Press Ganey surveys. It was believed that long term, mandatory education would be useful by narrowing the education gap among nursing staff to enhance their ability to think critically, understand disease process, and communicate more collegially with the interdisciplinary care team. Through this effort, patient outcomes such as incidence of errors, timely reporting of relevant assessment findings, and anticipatory intervention could be evaluated for a positive response. Methods: Four sessions each month were held so that staff RNs could attend a four-hour lecture. Four courses were presented: gastrointestinal disorders, the immune system & infectious processes, renal disorders, and endocrine/diabetes mellitus. Each RN was required to attend one session each month and complete the session exam. A make-up book with videotaped session and exam was available for outliers to complete. A minimum score was required to receive credit for the course. Findings: Outcome measurement will be completed by the end of 2006 to include quality of nursing documentation, physicians' perceptions of nursing knowledge and critical thinking capabilities, and incidence of errors disclosed through occurrence reporting. Conclusions: A discussion of the findings and interpretation will be available by the scheduled conference and will be included in the presentation. Implications for Practice: Will be included in the presentation pending review of findings to be completed prior to the scheduled conference.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleLeveling the Playing Field: Bridging the Knowledge Gap between Two-Year & Four-Year Prepared Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWithrow, TKen_US
dc.author.detailsTK Withrow, MSN, MEd, RN, Banner Desert Medical Center, Mesa, Arizona, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164225-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: An educational program was developed for a 36 bed medical surgical unit specializing in care of renal disease and diabetes in a large tertiary hospital in suburban Phoenix, Arizona. Through examination of the unit's DRGs by volume for 2005, specific coursework was developed to target high-volume disease processes to increase the knowledge base of all core nurses in the unit. This included an in-depth review of pathophysiology for selected disease processes as well as the typical disease course, diagnostic workup and pharmacological therapies. Examples of this coursework included gastrointestinal disorders, the immune system and infectious processes, renal disorders, and endocrine disorders including diabetes mellitus. Emphasis on critical thinking was supported through the use of case studies and course examinations with a minimum passing score. Significance: The goals of this program were several: first, to narrow the educational gap between graduates of two-year and four-year nursing programs. In this unit, diploma graduates are 14%, ADN graduates 46%, and BSN graduates 40% of the total RN staff. For relevancy, high volume DRG coded disorders from the unit were explored at the cellular level. Second, the program supported development of critical thinking skills by increasing understanding of disease process in order to better anticipate both typical disease course and recognition of deterioration or complications. Third, the professional responsibility of nursing was emphasized to understand medications' mechanisms of action and impact on particular disorders. Fourth, a consistent theme of exploration emphasized the use of research and evidence-based practices to maximize each patient's healing potential. Finally, considerable emphasis was placed on the emotional/psychosocial care of repeat admission populations such as end-stage renal disease. Caring behaviors and nursing interventions relevant to each group of disorders selected were discussed as part of the case study review. Background/Design: The unit described here had a history of high error reporting, poor evaluation of patient progress through the nurse documentation, and poor patient satisfaction scores obtained via Press Ganey surveys. It was believed that long term, mandatory education would be useful by narrowing the education gap among nursing staff to enhance their ability to think critically, understand disease process, and communicate more collegially with the interdisciplinary care team. Through this effort, patient outcomes such as incidence of errors, timely reporting of relevant assessment findings, and anticipatory intervention could be evaluated for a positive response. Methods: Four sessions each month were held so that staff RNs could attend a four-hour lecture. Four courses were presented: gastrointestinal disorders, the immune system & infectious processes, renal disorders, and endocrine/diabetes mellitus. Each RN was required to attend one session each month and complete the session exam. A make-up book with videotaped session and exam was available for outliers to complete. A minimum score was required to receive credit for the course. Findings: Outcome measurement will be completed by the end of 2006 to include quality of nursing documentation, physicians' perceptions of nursing knowledge and critical thinking capabilities, and incidence of errors disclosed through occurrence reporting. Conclusions: A discussion of the findings and interpretation will be available by the scheduled conference and will be included in the presentation. Implications for Practice: Will be included in the presentation pending review of findings to be completed prior to the scheduled conference.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:22Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Qualityen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationPhoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Outcomes: Ensuring Safety and Quality, held February 28-March 1 in Phoenix, Arizona, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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