The Development of the AMIS: An Instrument to Measure Self-Management and Independence Outcomes in Adolescents with Disabilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164233
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Development of the AMIS: An Instrument to Measure Self-Management and Independence Outcomes in Adolescents with Disabilities
Author(s):
Buran, C.; Sawin, K.; Modlin, S.; Brei, T.; Fastenau, P.
Author Details:
C. Buran, Clarian Health System, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; K. Sawin; S. Modlin; T. Brei; P. Fastenau
Abstract:
Problem/Purpose/Objectives: Achieving optimal functional outcomes, self-management and independence is critical for adolescents with chronic neurological conditions. The purposes of the study were to (1) develop an outcome tool, which measures adolescent ability to manage their condition and (2) establish preliminary validity and reliability of the tool. Significance: The most frequently used outcomes measures in rehabilitation settings are the Functional Measure of Independence (FIMTM) for adults and the WeeFIMTM for children. The items on the WeeFIMTM are normed for children who are 7 years of age and did not address complex self-management skills needed for adolescent independence. The Adolescent Self-Management and Independence Scale (AMIS) was developed as a supplemental outcomes measure to address these areas. Methods: This study was part of a larger cross-sectional investigation of Adaptation I Adolescents with Spina bifida. Adolescents aged 12-21 and their primary care giving parent participated in the overall study. This instrument development study was conducted in three phases: a qualitative phase (n=20); a content validity phase, and finally a pilot test (n=47). A review of the literature, input of experienced clinicians, and the qualitative phase were used to generate and revise items. In the content validity phase 13 adolescent and rehabilitation experts and seven family experts rated the items and scoring appropriateness on a scale of 1-4. A ten-item scale was created. The pilot phase was used to examine preliminary reliability and validity. Findings: The content validity index from adolescent and rehabilitation professionals was 3.6.Nine of the ten items were supported. Minor changes in wording or scoring were suggested. Evaluation of pilot data for individual items (scored on 1-7 scale) reflected one item had a ceiling effect (safety). Factor analysis yielded two subscales. The mean scores for teens were 3.7 (SD=1.2) with self-management at 3.9 (SD=1.6) and independence =4.4 (SD=1.3) reflecting only moderate independence in self management. Parent scores were 3.6, 3.8 and 4.3 respectively. Interclass correlation coefficient for parent/teen inter-rater reliability on the total AMIS was .84 (95% CI=.73 to .91). Cronbach alpha was .81 for parents and .87 for teens. The developmental construction of the tool was supported with 36% of the variance in the tool explained by age. Concurrent validity was supported with moderate correlations (controlling for age) to chores (r=. 68) and decision making maturity (r=.55). Conclusions: Content validity, concurrent validity, inter-rater reliability, and internal consistency data provide support for this new scale. One item has been deleted and eight added for the next round of testing of this instrument. Implications for Nursing Practice: Currently the research team is expanding the scale to better address components of self-management and independence, based on previously collected data. We will conduct a methodological study of the revised instrument.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Development of the AMIS: An Instrument to Measure Self-Management and Independence Outcomes in Adolescents with Disabilitiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuran, C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSawin, K.en_US
dc.contributor.authorModlin, S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrei, T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFastenau, P.en_US
dc.author.detailsC. Buran, Clarian Health System, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; K. Sawin; S. Modlin; T. Brei; P. Fastenauen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164233-
dc.description.abstractProblem/Purpose/Objectives: Achieving optimal functional outcomes, self-management and independence is critical for adolescents with chronic neurological conditions. The purposes of the study were to (1) develop an outcome tool, which measures adolescent ability to manage their condition and (2) establish preliminary validity and reliability of the tool. Significance: The most frequently used outcomes measures in rehabilitation settings are the Functional Measure of Independence (FIMTM) for adults and the WeeFIMTM for children. The items on the WeeFIMTM are normed for children who are 7 years of age and did not address complex self-management skills needed for adolescent independence. The Adolescent Self-Management and Independence Scale (AMIS) was developed as a supplemental outcomes measure to address these areas. Methods: This study was part of a larger cross-sectional investigation of Adaptation I Adolescents with Spina bifida. Adolescents aged 12-21 and their primary care giving parent participated in the overall study. This instrument development study was conducted in three phases: a qualitative phase (n=20); a content validity phase, and finally a pilot test (n=47). A review of the literature, input of experienced clinicians, and the qualitative phase were used to generate and revise items. In the content validity phase 13 adolescent and rehabilitation experts and seven family experts rated the items and scoring appropriateness on a scale of 1-4. A ten-item scale was created. The pilot phase was used to examine preliminary reliability and validity. Findings: The content validity index from adolescent and rehabilitation professionals was 3.6.Nine of the ten items were supported. Minor changes in wording or scoring were suggested. Evaluation of pilot data for individual items (scored on 1-7 scale) reflected one item had a ceiling effect (safety). Factor analysis yielded two subscales. The mean scores for teens were 3.7 (SD=1.2) with self-management at 3.9 (SD=1.6) and independence =4.4 (SD=1.3) reflecting only moderate independence in self management. Parent scores were 3.6, 3.8 and 4.3 respectively. Interclass correlation coefficient for parent/teen inter-rater reliability on the total AMIS was .84 (95% CI=.73 to .91). Cronbach alpha was .81 for parents and .87 for teens. The developmental construction of the tool was supported with 36% of the variance in the tool explained by age. Concurrent validity was supported with moderate correlations (controlling for age) to chores (r=. 68) and decision making maturity (r=.55). Conclusions: Content validity, concurrent validity, inter-rater reliability, and internal consistency data provide support for this new scale. One item has been deleted and eight added for the next round of testing of this instrument. Implications for Nursing Practice: Currently the research team is expanding the scale to better address components of self-management and independence, based on previously collected data. We will conduct a methodological study of the revised instrument.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:31Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:31Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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