2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164235
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Credentialing: Developing And Implementing Efficient Processes
Author(s):
Chaney, Harriet S.; Burrer, Nita R.; Ault, Patricia; Broadway, Jacqueline
Author Details:
Harriett S. Chaney, PhD, APRN, BC, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Nita R. Burrer RN, APRN, BC; Patricia Ault APRN, BC; Jacqueline Broadway, APRN, BC
Abstract:
Problem: Credentialing of advanced practice nurses (APN) is a requirement that has taken on new dimensions because of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Transmittal 1776, issued in October 2002. Transmittal 1776 delineates the circumstances in which the APN can bill for their services. Billing for services requires credentialing with primary source verification of education, certification, licensure and professional practice history. Purpose: To develop and implement an efficient comprehensive credentialing process for 200 current and future APNs including clinical nurse specialists (CNS), nurse practitioners (NP) and certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNA). Significance/Justification: Credentialing is a process of verification that all licensed personnel undergo as new employees when their current license and former employers are verified. Credentialing for APNs is far more extensive, meeting the same threshold as physician credentialing for practice and third party reimbursement. The process is sometimes not well understood and can be uncomfortable because selected professional peers review highly sensitive personal/professional information. Practice Innovation/Methods: The process began with a review of standard credentialing practices and internal resources for the program. An Advanced Practice Nurse Credentialing Committee (APNCC), chaired by a CNS, was formed and related policies and procedures were developed. The services of the institutional Medical Staff Office were used to avoid departmental duplication. Following implementation, challenging issues were addressed and the credentialing activities advanced to an online approval process by the APNCC. Evaluation: Developing and implementing the program and credentialing 200 APNs was completed in slightly less than six months. This included 31 nurses authorized as a CNS and 20 nurses holding both a CNS and NP credential. The process ensured that every committee member had the opportunity to conduct a detailed review of the files for both current and APN applicants. Each member became an ambassador for the program and contributed to the modifications as the program evolved. Reimbursement outcomes are currently being evaluated. Implications for Practice: A comprehensive credentialing program for nurses authorized as a CNS, NP and/or CRNA is required for billing of APN services under Transmittal 1776. Comprehensive credentialing also promotes the linkage between an APN's authorization/certification and their scope of practice. Involving as many APNs as possible in the process promotes an understanding of the credentialing program.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCredentialing: Developing And Implementing Efficient Processesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChaney, Harriet S.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBurrer, Nita R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAult, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorBroadway, Jacquelineen_US
dc.author.detailsHarriett S. Chaney, PhD, APRN, BC, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Nita R. Burrer RN, APRN, BC; Patricia Ault APRN, BC; Jacqueline Broadway, APRN, BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164235-
dc.description.abstractProblem: Credentialing of advanced practice nurses (APN) is a requirement that has taken on new dimensions because of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Transmittal 1776, issued in October 2002. Transmittal 1776 delineates the circumstances in which the APN can bill for their services. Billing for services requires credentialing with primary source verification of education, certification, licensure and professional practice history. Purpose: To develop and implement an efficient comprehensive credentialing process for 200 current and future APNs including clinical nurse specialists (CNS), nurse practitioners (NP) and certified registered nurse anesthetists (CRNA). Significance/Justification: Credentialing is a process of verification that all licensed personnel undergo as new employees when their current license and former employers are verified. Credentialing for APNs is far more extensive, meeting the same threshold as physician credentialing for practice and third party reimbursement. The process is sometimes not well understood and can be uncomfortable because selected professional peers review highly sensitive personal/professional information. Practice Innovation/Methods: The process began with a review of standard credentialing practices and internal resources for the program. An Advanced Practice Nurse Credentialing Committee (APNCC), chaired by a CNS, was formed and related policies and procedures were developed. The services of the institutional Medical Staff Office were used to avoid departmental duplication. Following implementation, challenging issues were addressed and the credentialing activities advanced to an online approval process by the APNCC. Evaluation: Developing and implementing the program and credentialing 200 APNs was completed in slightly less than six months. This included 31 nurses authorized as a CNS and 20 nurses holding both a CNS and NP credential. The process ensured that every committee member had the opportunity to conduct a detailed review of the files for both current and APN applicants. Each member became an ambassador for the program and contributed to the modifications as the program evolved. Reimbursement outcomes are currently being evaluated. Implications for Practice: A comprehensive credentialing program for nurses authorized as a CNS, NP and/or CRNA is required for billing of APN services under Transmittal 1776. Comprehensive credentialing also promotes the linkage between an APN's authorization/certification and their scope of practice. Involving as many APNs as possible in the process promotes an understanding of the credentialing program.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:33Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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