2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164237
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Synergy in Practice: The CNS Role in Caring for Victims of Intimate Partner Violence
Author(s):
Cox, Erin
Author Details:
Erin Cox, MSN, RN, CCRN, CS, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Problem: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significantly prevalent health issue that creates devastating effects for victims, their families, and the community. Despite all of the literature regarding IPV frequency and awareness, there is still a compliance issue regarding screening for IPV in health care settings. Purpose: Through the tenets of CNS practice, Clinical Nurse Specialists have the resources, opportunity, skill level, and knowledge base to improve patient outcomes. Background/Significance: IPV has public health implications that effect current victims and may impact future generations. IPV extends across social, religious, economical, geographical, and cultural groups. While all people are at risk for IPV, women are five times more likely to be victimized. Methods: The dynamics of IPV are complicated and involved many social, economical, cultural, and religious entities. The Synergy Model for Nursing Practice is a theoretical framework that seeks to correlate nurse competencies with patient characteristics, therefore providing optimal care. The model allows the CNS to identify patient, staff nurse, and family needs, as well as individualize care. Implications for CNS Practice: The CNS can optimize care of these patients throughout different spheres of influence including: 1) Patients/families: direct, expert-level patient care, education, holistic approach, and advocacy. 2) Professional nursing: Increasing awareness, compliance with screening, role modeling, improving documentation standards, consultation, research, and education relating to mechanisms/patterns of injury. 3) Organization/system: Education, increasing public awareness, prevention programs, and political activism. Outcomes: Successful outcomes are documented by increased compliance with identification/ screening and documentation standards. Tools for effective practice and treatment plan (i.e. referral options) for the staff nurse will be implemented. Also, identifying barriers to screening and cultural issues regarding IPV will document educational program effectiveness.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSynergy in Practice: The CNS Role in Caring for Victims of Intimate Partner Violenceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCox, Erinen_US
dc.author.detailsErin Cox, MSN, RN, CCRN, CS, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164237-
dc.description.abstractProblem: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a significantly prevalent health issue that creates devastating effects for victims, their families, and the community. Despite all of the literature regarding IPV frequency and awareness, there is still a compliance issue regarding screening for IPV in health care settings. Purpose: Through the tenets of CNS practice, Clinical Nurse Specialists have the resources, opportunity, skill level, and knowledge base to improve patient outcomes. Background/Significance: IPV has public health implications that effect current victims and may impact future generations. IPV extends across social, religious, economical, geographical, and cultural groups. While all people are at risk for IPV, women are five times more likely to be victimized. Methods: The dynamics of IPV are complicated and involved many social, economical, cultural, and religious entities. The Synergy Model for Nursing Practice is a theoretical framework that seeks to correlate nurse competencies with patient characteristics, therefore providing optimal care. The model allows the CNS to identify patient, staff nurse, and family needs, as well as individualize care. Implications for CNS Practice: The CNS can optimize care of these patients throughout different spheres of influence including: 1) Patients/families: direct, expert-level patient care, education, holistic approach, and advocacy. 2) Professional nursing: Increasing awareness, compliance with screening, role modeling, improving documentation standards, consultation, research, and education relating to mechanisms/patterns of injury. 3) Organization/system: Education, increasing public awareness, prevention programs, and political activism. Outcomes: Successful outcomes are documented by increased compliance with identification/ screening and documentation standards. Tools for effective practice and treatment plan (i.e. referral options) for the staff nurse will be implemented. Also, identifying barriers to screening and cultural issues regarding IPV will document educational program effectiveness.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:36Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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