2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164238
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurse Clinician: An Old Name for a New Role
Author(s):
Craven, Heather L.; Thornby, Denise C.
Author Details:
Heather L. Craven, RN, MS, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Denise C. Thornby, RN, MS
Abstract:
Problem: A large academic medical center searches for strategies to optimize support for nurses within an environment of shrinking resources and impending nursing shortages. Purpose: Implement a program to enhance nursing staff development and retention while promoting an environment that supports nurses' optimal contributions to patient care. Significance/Justification: The need for this change was driven by several factors, including lack of traditional Clinical Nurse Specialists within the organization; confusion and inconsistent unit/division based education roles; diversion of clinical resources from patient care to provide education and orientation; and lack of advanced practice skills available for key performance improvement processes and practice advancement within nursing. Practice Innovation/Methods: Building upon the success experienced by isolated nursing units, an old role, the Nurse Clinician, was redesigned and brought back to life to create unit-based advance practice nurses throughout the organization. Using the American Nurses Association's Scope and Standards of Advanced Practice Registered Nursing (1996), a position description was developed based on the five traditional domains of the Clinical Nurse Specialist: education, clinical practice, collaboration, consultation and research. Outcome based criteria for evaluating the role was then defined within each domain. Working closely with unit managers and nursing leadership, a plan was developed and implemented to transition the organization from population or division based advance practice nurses and unit based staff providing staff development and orientation to the new model. Evaluation: Based on the defined outcome criteria, ongoing data collection and analysis indicates the Nurse Clinician model has made a significant impact in achieving the desired outcomes of staff retention, satisfaction and an improved quality of nursing practice. Implications for Practice: This system change demonstrates how to create and implement unit-based Clinical Nurse Specialist in a budget neutral manner; the importance of building partnerships within nursing leadership; and the use of principles of transition management to successfully implement a role redesign.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurse Clinician: An Old Name for a New Roleen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCraven, Heather L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorThornby, Denise C.en_US
dc.author.detailsHeather L. Craven, RN, MS, Virginia Commonwealth University Health System, Richmond, Virginia, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Denise C. Thornby, RN, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164238-
dc.description.abstractProblem: A large academic medical center searches for strategies to optimize support for nurses within an environment of shrinking resources and impending nursing shortages. Purpose: Implement a program to enhance nursing staff development and retention while promoting an environment that supports nurses' optimal contributions to patient care. Significance/Justification: The need for this change was driven by several factors, including lack of traditional Clinical Nurse Specialists within the organization; confusion and inconsistent unit/division based education roles; diversion of clinical resources from patient care to provide education and orientation; and lack of advanced practice skills available for key performance improvement processes and practice advancement within nursing. Practice Innovation/Methods: Building upon the success experienced by isolated nursing units, an old role, the Nurse Clinician, was redesigned and brought back to life to create unit-based advance practice nurses throughout the organization. Using the American Nurses Association's Scope and Standards of Advanced Practice Registered Nursing (1996), a position description was developed based on the five traditional domains of the Clinical Nurse Specialist: education, clinical practice, collaboration, consultation and research. Outcome based criteria for evaluating the role was then defined within each domain. Working closely with unit managers and nursing leadership, a plan was developed and implemented to transition the organization from population or division based advance practice nurses and unit based staff providing staff development and orientation to the new model. Evaluation: Based on the defined outcome criteria, ongoing data collection and analysis indicates the Nurse Clinician model has made a significant impact in achieving the desired outcomes of staff retention, satisfaction and an improved quality of nursing practice. Implications for Practice: This system change demonstrates how to create and implement unit-based Clinical Nurse Specialist in a budget neutral manner; the importance of building partnerships within nursing leadership; and the use of principles of transition management to successfully implement a role redesign.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:37Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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