Privatization of Public Health and its Impact on Clinical Practica for Community/Public Health Clinical Nurse Specialist Students

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164241
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Privatization of Public Health and its Impact on Clinical Practica for Community/Public Health Clinical Nurse Specialist Students
Author(s):
Donley, Rosemary; Flaherty, Mary Jean; Dudley-Brown, Sharon; Sarsfield, Eileen; Maloni, Heidi; Taylor, Laura
Author Details:
Sr. Rosemary Donley, PhD, C-ANP, FAAN, The Catholic University of America (CUA) School of Nursing, Washington DC, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Sr. Mary Jean Flaherty, PhD, RN, FAAN; Sharon Dudley-Brown, PhD, APRN-BC, FNP; Eileen Sarsfield, MSN, APRN, BC; Heidi Maloni, SMN, CNRN, CRNP, MSCN; Laura Taylor, MS, RN
Abstract:
Purpose/Objectives: The immediate objective is to increase the knowledge of preceptors working in community clinics and managed care organizations (MCOs) concerning population-based care and the role of community/public health clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). The long-term objective is to graduate students educated as community/public health CNSs who will work in the community and serve as preceptors. Background/Rationale: Approximately 50% of the public health nurse workforce do not have a baccalaureate or higher nursing degree. Additionally, there are an insufficient number of community/public health CNSs working in community clinics and managed care organizations, who can be preceptors and models for graduate students enrolled in The Catholic University of America's (CUA) community/public health CNS program "Care of Vulnerable People in Communities". This program prepares advanced practice nurses to provide population based care to vulnerable populations in communities. The lack of qualified preceptors presents a challenge for faculty placing students in the community/public health clinical courses. Description of Process: Faculty meet with preceptors at the beginning of the semester to describe the advanced practice role of the community/public health CNS and course objectives. Frequent site visits and ongoing meetings between the faculty, preceptor and student are an integral part of the process. The clinical courses include activities by the graduate students specific to the CNS role; student projects benefit the clinical sites. Evaluation/Outcomes: Since the community/public health program began in 2000, 11 students were placed with 13 preceptors in 11 clinical sites in Washington, DC. Six sites were in the community. The educational background of the preceptors ranged from a college prepared non-nurse to MDs. Ten of the preceptors were nurses, ranging from BSN to doctorally prepared; 4 were prepared as CNSs. Evaluations of the preceptors were all positive. Interpretation/Conclusion: Many health departments across the country, such as that of Washington, DC, contract out provision of direct services to community clinics and MCOs. It is therefore imperative to introduce population-based practice in community clinics and MCOs and to improve the educational preparation of community/public health nurses. Implications for Nursing Practice: This effort has implications for workforce improvement. A potential research question considers the impact of community/public health CNSs on health outcomes of vulnerable populations in community settings.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrivatization of Public Health and its Impact on Clinical Practica for Community/Public Health Clinical Nurse Specialist Studentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDonley, Rosemaryen_US
dc.contributor.authorFlaherty, Mary Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorDudley-Brown, Sharonen_US
dc.contributor.authorSarsfield, Eileenen_US
dc.contributor.authorMaloni, Heidien_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Lauraen_US
dc.author.detailsSr. Rosemary Donley, PhD, C-ANP, FAAN, The Catholic University of America (CUA) School of Nursing, Washington DC, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Sr. Mary Jean Flaherty, PhD, RN, FAAN; Sharon Dudley-Brown, PhD, APRN-BC, FNP; Eileen Sarsfield, MSN, APRN, BC; Heidi Maloni, SMN, CNRN, CRNP, MSCN; Laura Taylor, MS, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164241-
dc.description.abstractPurpose/Objectives: The immediate objective is to increase the knowledge of preceptors working in community clinics and managed care organizations (MCOs) concerning population-based care and the role of community/public health clinical nurse specialists (CNSs). The long-term objective is to graduate students educated as community/public health CNSs who will work in the community and serve as preceptors. Background/Rationale: Approximately 50% of the public health nurse workforce do not have a baccalaureate or higher nursing degree. Additionally, there are an insufficient number of community/public health CNSs working in community clinics and managed care organizations, who can be preceptors and models for graduate students enrolled in The Catholic University of America's (CUA) community/public health CNS program "Care of Vulnerable People in Communities". This program prepares advanced practice nurses to provide population based care to vulnerable populations in communities. The lack of qualified preceptors presents a challenge for faculty placing students in the community/public health clinical courses. Description of Process: Faculty meet with preceptors at the beginning of the semester to describe the advanced practice role of the community/public health CNS and course objectives. Frequent site visits and ongoing meetings between the faculty, preceptor and student are an integral part of the process. The clinical courses include activities by the graduate students specific to the CNS role; student projects benefit the clinical sites. Evaluation/Outcomes: Since the community/public health program began in 2000, 11 students were placed with 13 preceptors in 11 clinical sites in Washington, DC. Six sites were in the community. The educational background of the preceptors ranged from a college prepared non-nurse to MDs. Ten of the preceptors were nurses, ranging from BSN to doctorally prepared; 4 were prepared as CNSs. Evaluations of the preceptors were all positive. Interpretation/Conclusion: Many health departments across the country, such as that of Washington, DC, contract out provision of direct services to community clinics and MCOs. It is therefore imperative to introduce population-based practice in community clinics and MCOs and to improve the educational preparation of community/public health nurses. Implications for Nursing Practice: This effort has implications for workforce improvement. A potential research question considers the impact of community/public health CNSs on health outcomes of vulnerable populations in community settings.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:40Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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