2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164243
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist in a Multiple ICU Medical Center
Author(s):
Dukes, Susan F.; Mortimer, Darcy L.
Author Details:
Susan F. Dukes, CCRN, MS, CCNS, ACNP, Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Capt. Darcy L. Mortimer, CCRN, MSN
Abstract:
Problem and Significance: Cost containment, staffing shortages, technological advancements, expanding medical knowledge, and high patient acuity challenges hospitals to provide quality patient focused care. The literature supports that Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS) are invaluable patient care resources both economically and in terms of patient, physician, and staff satisfaction. Practice Innovation: One masters level prepared critical care nurse was identified to perform full time in the Critical Care CNS (CC CNS) role. The CC CNS responded to the needs of three intensive care units, a step-down unit, and a telemetry ward. Implementation: The American Association of Critical Care Nurses' (AACN) Synergy Model was used as a foundation for the CC CNS's practice (Moloney-Harmon, 1999). The CC CNS obtained support and learned the expectations of the role from the appropriate nursing and administrative leadership. Evaluation: Over time, the CC CNS role has evolved. The factors contributing to changes in the role include: (a) a severe nurse staffing shortage, (b) differing views of what the CNS role entails, and (c) limited material resources to support the role. Optimal CC CNS utilization, including all of the CNS characteristics as identified in the AACN Synergy Model, is still elusive. However, the Synergy Model remains in place as a guide for the role. For instance, it was used as the basis of the CNS job description. Leadership recognizes the positive impact the CC CNS makes and continues to support the CC CNS role. Notable CC CNS contributions include: (a) in excess of 1231 of continuing education hours provided, (b) 98% compliance with medical readiness training, (c) the implementation of a standardized critical care course, (d) an improved staff orientation program, and (e) 90% compliance with JCAHO training. Implications for Practice: The AACN Synergy Model can be readily applied to the CC CNS role to provide structure and credibility for the role. The CC CNS has positively impacted patient care and staff development. However, CC CNSs should diligently document their contributions and the positive impact they make on the quality of patient focused care and patient, physician, and staff satisfaction. This documentation will help them to more effectively advocate and develop the CNS role in the critical care environment. Moloney-Harmon, P. A. (1999). The synergy model: Contemporary practice of the clinical nurse specialist. Critical Care Nurse, 19 (2), 101-104.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2004
Conference Name:
2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
San Antonio, Texas, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist in a Multiple ICU Medical Centeren_GB
dc.contributor.authorDukes, Susan F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMortimer, Darcy L.en_US
dc.author.detailsSusan F. Dukes, CCRN, MS, CCNS, ACNP, Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Capt. Darcy L. Mortimer, CCRN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164243-
dc.description.abstractProblem and Significance: Cost containment, staffing shortages, technological advancements, expanding medical knowledge, and high patient acuity challenges hospitals to provide quality patient focused care. The literature supports that Clinical Nurse Specialists (CNS) are invaluable patient care resources both economically and in terms of patient, physician, and staff satisfaction. Practice Innovation: One masters level prepared critical care nurse was identified to perform full time in the Critical Care CNS (CC CNS) role. The CC CNS responded to the needs of three intensive care units, a step-down unit, and a telemetry ward. Implementation: The American Association of Critical Care Nurses' (AACN) Synergy Model was used as a foundation for the CC CNS's practice (Moloney-Harmon, 1999). The CC CNS obtained support and learned the expectations of the role from the appropriate nursing and administrative leadership. Evaluation: Over time, the CC CNS role has evolved. The factors contributing to changes in the role include: (a) a severe nurse staffing shortage, (b) differing views of what the CNS role entails, and (c) limited material resources to support the role. Optimal CC CNS utilization, including all of the CNS characteristics as identified in the AACN Synergy Model, is still elusive. However, the Synergy Model remains in place as a guide for the role. For instance, it was used as the basis of the CNS job description. Leadership recognizes the positive impact the CC CNS makes and continues to support the CC CNS role. Notable CC CNS contributions include: (a) in excess of 1231 of continuing education hours provided, (b) 98% compliance with medical readiness training, (c) the implementation of a standardized critical care course, (d) an improved staff orientation program, and (e) 90% compliance with JCAHO training. Implications for Practice: The AACN Synergy Model can be readily applied to the CC CNS role to provide structure and credibility for the role. The CC CNS has positively impacted patient care and staff development. However, CC CNSs should diligently document their contributions and the positive impact they make on the quality of patient focused care and patient, physician, and staff satisfaction. This documentation will help them to more effectively advocate and develop the CNS role in the critical care environment. Moloney-Harmon, P. A. (1999). The synergy model: Contemporary practice of the clinical nurse specialist. Critical Care Nurse, 19 (2), 101-104.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:42Z-
dc.conference.date2004en_US
dc.conference.name2004 NACNS Conference, Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Centuryen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSan Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Renaissance in CNS Practice: Transforming Nursing in the 21st Century, held on March 11 to 13, 2004 in San Antonio, Texas, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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