15.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164247
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Office of Clinician Support: Caring for Children's Hospital Clinicians
Author(s):
Andrus, Jason; Baptista, Lourival; Coyne, Lauren; DeMaso, David
Author Details:
Jason Andrus, MD, Children's Hospital Boston, Department of Psychiatry, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Lourival Baptista, MD; Lauren Coyne, MS, RN, LICSW; David DeMaso, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe an onsite support program implemented to promote employee mental health. Significance: Clinical work in a children's hospital is challenging and stressful. Clinicians are vulnerable to psychosocial difficulties and even suboptimal patient care. Preventive support programs that promote communication have been recommended to enhance patient safety. Design: To promote optimum patient care, advanced practice nurses can use their psychiatric skills and hospital knowledge to assess and intervene with hospital clinicians. Their involvement can have a significant positive impact on clinician mental health and may improve patient outcomes. Methods: The Office of Clinician Support (OCS) provides a safe alternative channel for all hospital clinicians to discuss and resolve a range of "work-related" and "personal" issues. The program aims to assist clinicians with any problems they may be having, including interpersonal misunderstandings and/or conflicts. Individual and group services are offered that range from creating an awareness of work- related stresses, to discussions about personal concerns to mental health assessments to crisis intervention. Findings: In its 4th year, nearly 850 individual consultations with the following presenting problems: 55% non-patient work (e.g. communication and conflict), 49% personal and/or family, and 12% hospital patient concerns. Over 1000 clinicians in the past year have had contact with an OCS educational/group intervention. Using a 5- point Likert scale (with 5 being excellent), the OCS had the following mean satisfaction ratings: safe place to talk (4.81) confidentiality respected (4.89), quality (4.78), recommend to colleague (4.73), place to voice safety concerns (4.46), met my needs (4.67), and come back (4.69). Conclusions: OCS is an innovative program providing safe alternative communication channel for hospital clinicians. The program has been well received as evidenced by high clinician utilization patterns and satisfaction ratings. Implications for Practice: OCS provides an accessible safe place for hospital clinicians to talk. The program is replicable in other hospitals. For many years, advanced practice nurses have provided a service to colleagues by responding to informal requests for support and mental health consultation. OCS has been successful in formalizing the contributions of APNs into a structured program that promotes wellness and improved patient care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOffice of Clinician Support: Caring for Children's Hospital Cliniciansen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAndrus, Jasonen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaptista, Lourivalen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoyne, Laurenen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeMaso, Daviden_US
dc.author.detailsJason Andrus, MD, Children's Hospital Boston, Department of Psychiatry, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Lourival Baptista, MD; Lauren Coyne, MS, RN, LICSW; David DeMaso, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164247-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe an onsite support program implemented to promote employee mental health. Significance: Clinical work in a children's hospital is challenging and stressful. Clinicians are vulnerable to psychosocial difficulties and even suboptimal patient care. Preventive support programs that promote communication have been recommended to enhance patient safety. Design: To promote optimum patient care, advanced practice nurses can use their psychiatric skills and hospital knowledge to assess and intervene with hospital clinicians. Their involvement can have a significant positive impact on clinician mental health and may improve patient outcomes. Methods: The Office of Clinician Support (OCS) provides a safe alternative channel for all hospital clinicians to discuss and resolve a range of "work-related" and "personal" issues. The program aims to assist clinicians with any problems they may be having, including interpersonal misunderstandings and/or conflicts. Individual and group services are offered that range from creating an awareness of work- related stresses, to discussions about personal concerns to mental health assessments to crisis intervention. Findings: In its 4th year, nearly 850 individual consultations with the following presenting problems: 55% non-patient work (e.g. communication and conflict), 49% personal and/or family, and 12% hospital patient concerns. Over 1000 clinicians in the past year have had contact with an OCS educational/group intervention. Using a 5- point Likert scale (with 5 being excellent), the OCS had the following mean satisfaction ratings: safe place to talk (4.81) confidentiality respected (4.89), quality (4.78), recommend to colleague (4.73), place to voice safety concerns (4.46), met my needs (4.67), and come back (4.69). Conclusions: OCS is an innovative program providing safe alternative communication channel for hospital clinicians. The program has been well received as evidenced by high clinician utilization patterns and satisfaction ratings. Implications for Practice: OCS provides an accessible safe place for hospital clinicians to talk. The program is replicable in other hospitals. For many years, advanced practice nurses have provided a service to colleagues by responding to informal requests for support and mental health consultation. OCS has been successful in formalizing the contributions of APNs into a structured program that promotes wellness and improved patient care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:46Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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