2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164251
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Popularity & Perils of Implanted Pain Infusion Pumps
Author(s):
Barksdale, Peggy
Author Details:
Peggy Barksdale, MSN, RN, OCNS-C, Community Health Network, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the benefits and complications of implanted pain pumps in Total Joint Replacement (TJR) patients and the importance of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in advancing quality and safety for this patient population. Significance: Previous studies have shown that pain management in post-operative TJR patients has been less than optimal. More than 50 years ago continuous regional anesthetic was introduced. Technology has brought various implantable pumps that are place directly into the wound. Studies vary in favorable and consequential outcomes. Design: In February 2006, peripheral nerve blocks were utilized in hospitalized TJR patients and implanted pain pump with adjustable rate was applied. This novelty device caught staff nurses and the CNS to be unfamiliar and ill-prepared in patient care. The CNS needed to educate staff and evaluate the product in regards to positive/negative outcomes. The Product Analysis Committee was being inundated with numerous pumps from vendors. The Orthopaedic CNS was to intervene and assimilate data regarding a single device for a limited time period. Methods: The efficacy in the management of pain in patients that had a nerve block along with an implanted pump was being questioned. A random selection of patients was examined from the documentation of pain in the computerized chart of the TJR patient. Using the visual analog scale to describe intensity as 0 for no pain to 10 for worst possible, totals were extracted. Assessment of possible side effects such as infusion site and observed symptoms of toxicity was collected. Findings: More than a third of the TJR patients rated pain on the first postoperative day as 0/10. A majority of the patients verbalized a rating as less than 4/10. No side effects were documented in physician or nurse notes. Conclusions: Implanted pain pumps do decrease pain in postoperative TJR patients and this population has exhibited no minimal or adverse side effects with their usage. Implications for Practice: Implanted pumps with continuous administration of a local anesthetic improve pain in hospitalized TJR patients. Appropriate management of pain could lead to decreased length of stay and increased patient satisfaction.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePopularity & Perils of Implanted Pain Infusion Pumpsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarksdale, Peggyen_US
dc.author.detailsPeggy Barksdale, MSN, RN, OCNS-C, Community Health Network, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164251-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study is to examine the benefits and complications of implanted pain pumps in Total Joint Replacement (TJR) patients and the importance of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) in advancing quality and safety for this patient population. Significance: Previous studies have shown that pain management in post-operative TJR patients has been less than optimal. More than 50 years ago continuous regional anesthetic was introduced. Technology has brought various implantable pumps that are place directly into the wound. Studies vary in favorable and consequential outcomes. Design: In February 2006, peripheral nerve blocks were utilized in hospitalized TJR patients and implanted pain pump with adjustable rate was applied. This novelty device caught staff nurses and the CNS to be unfamiliar and ill-prepared in patient care. The CNS needed to educate staff and evaluate the product in regards to positive/negative outcomes. The Product Analysis Committee was being inundated with numerous pumps from vendors. The Orthopaedic CNS was to intervene and assimilate data regarding a single device for a limited time period. Methods: The efficacy in the management of pain in patients that had a nerve block along with an implanted pump was being questioned. A random selection of patients was examined from the documentation of pain in the computerized chart of the TJR patient. Using the visual analog scale to describe intensity as 0 for no pain to 10 for worst possible, totals were extracted. Assessment of possible side effects such as infusion site and observed symptoms of toxicity was collected. Findings: More than a third of the TJR patients rated pain on the first postoperative day as 0/10. A majority of the patients verbalized a rating as less than 4/10. No side effects were documented in physician or nurse notes. Conclusions: Implanted pain pumps do decrease pain in postoperative TJR patients and this population has exhibited no minimal or adverse side effects with their usage. Implications for Practice: Implanted pumps with continuous administration of a local anesthetic improve pain in hospitalized TJR patients. Appropriate management of pain could lead to decreased length of stay and increased patient satisfaction.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:51Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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