2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164253
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing the Percentage of Foley Catheters in Patients 65 and Older
Author(s):
Blakely, Michele
Author Details:
Michele Blakely, MSN, RN, CCTC, Wake Forest University, Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: Foley catheters are a standard method of treatment for many elderly inpatients. Unfortunately, many have catheters inserted in the emergency department that remain until discharge. Foley catheters are associated with urinary tract infections, trauma, pyelonephritis, urethral damage, and pain, which can lead to increased length of stay, delayed discharge, and in some circumstances, death from bacteremia. Of significant concern was that many patients had Foley catheters inserted for convenience (i.e. difficulty getting quick specimens, or difficulty getting patients to the rest room in the emergency department or incontinent patients with frequent linen changes) thus the purpose of this project. Significance: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, urinary tract infections are the most commonly reported nosocomial infection in the US. Nosocomial UTIs cost the nation's hospitals $1.8 billion annually. Catheter associated urinary tract infections contribute to antibiotic resistance, delay a patient's recovery, and increase healthcare costs. Design: Many patients have extended lengths of stay due to nosocomial urinary tract infections which costs both the hospital and the patient financially and physically; prompting this project to reduce the percentage of older patients who maintained indwelling urinary catheters. Methods: A pilot project and assessment tool were designed by the medical-surgical clinical nurse specialist. The project was implemented on two, adult medical-surgical nursing units for four weeks. Nurses were asked to assess appropriateness of Foley catheters for each patient in their assignments who had a catheter every twenty-four hours. Findings: Since initiation of this project nurses now screen all patients who are admitted with Foley catheters for their medical necessity, if the patient does not meet the evidence-based criteria the physician is contacted for an order to discontinue catheter use. Conclusions: The intent with continued favorable results from this performance improvement process will be demonstrated deductions morbidity and mortality of these elderly patients, while promoting efficient, quality patient care. Our positive results will reflect to the community our commitment to clinical quality as an academic medical center practicing superior elder care. Implications for Practice: Implications include a nursing assessment to remove indwelling urinary catheters that are not medically warranted.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing the Percentage of Foley Catheters in Patients 65 and Olderen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBlakely, Micheleen_US
dc.author.detailsMichele Blakely, MSN, RN, CCTC, Wake Forest University, Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164253-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Foley catheters are a standard method of treatment for many elderly inpatients. Unfortunately, many have catheters inserted in the emergency department that remain until discharge. Foley catheters are associated with urinary tract infections, trauma, pyelonephritis, urethral damage, and pain, which can lead to increased length of stay, delayed discharge, and in some circumstances, death from bacteremia. Of significant concern was that many patients had Foley catheters inserted for convenience (i.e. difficulty getting quick specimens, or difficulty getting patients to the rest room in the emergency department or incontinent patients with frequent linen changes) thus the purpose of this project. Significance: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, urinary tract infections are the most commonly reported nosocomial infection in the US. Nosocomial UTIs cost the nation's hospitals $1.8 billion annually. Catheter associated urinary tract infections contribute to antibiotic resistance, delay a patient's recovery, and increase healthcare costs. Design: Many patients have extended lengths of stay due to nosocomial urinary tract infections which costs both the hospital and the patient financially and physically; prompting this project to reduce the percentage of older patients who maintained indwelling urinary catheters. Methods: A pilot project and assessment tool were designed by the medical-surgical clinical nurse specialist. The project was implemented on two, adult medical-surgical nursing units for four weeks. Nurses were asked to assess appropriateness of Foley catheters for each patient in their assignments who had a catheter every twenty-four hours. Findings: Since initiation of this project nurses now screen all patients who are admitted with Foley catheters for their medical necessity, if the patient does not meet the evidence-based criteria the physician is contacted for an order to discontinue catheter use. Conclusions: The intent with continued favorable results from this performance improvement process will be demonstrated deductions morbidity and mortality of these elderly patients, while promoting efficient, quality patient care. Our positive results will reflect to the community our commitment to clinical quality as an academic medical center practicing superior elder care. Implications for Practice: Implications include a nursing assessment to remove indwelling urinary catheters that are not medically warranted.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:53Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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