2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164255
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Integrating High Fidelity Simulation into a Regional PALS Course for Western North Carolina
Author(s):
Braswell, Karen; Carpenter, Alesia
Author Details:
Karen Braswell, MSN, RN-BC, Mission Hospitals, Asheville, North Carolina, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Alesia Carpenter, MSN, APRN, BC, CS, CDE, Mission Hospitals AB Tech, Enka Campus, Candler, North Carolina, USA
Abstract:
Purpose: To determine if high fidelity simulation would make a difference in learning and participation in a standardized pediatric advanced life support course for healthcare providers. Significance: High fidelity simulation has been used in medical, anesthesia and emergency medical education for several years. With the advent of the newly revised pediatric advanced life support guidelines for 2005, the question was posed: Would the development and implementation of high fidelity pediatric advanced life support simulations improve student's knowledge and participation in the skills and testing stations in an existing course? Design: Pediatric Life Support courses began in the 1990's with the American Heart Association. PALS classes have been taught at local training centers for about 15 years. The Regional Faculty/Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist at a southeastern trauma center reviewed the new guidelines after having been exposed to simulation and wondered if this new teaching methodology would benefit the course. Working collaboratively with the Regional Simulation Laboratory Coordinator, scenarios were developed for the new algorithms. These were trialed by a group of local healthcare experts and were implemented into the existing course in March 2007. Methods: Through a series of meetings, the Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist and the Regional Simulation Laboratory Coordinator developed 14 pediatric advanced life support scenarios based on the current guidelines. Findings: After trialing the 14 scenarios with a small group of healthcare providers, they were implemented into the PALS course in March 2007. Pre and post simulation surveys were administered to students. The results have indicated simulation is an effective teaching tool. Conclusions: Simulated scenarios are being used monthly in the PALS course for skills and testing stations. Data from 4 months indicated a greater than 50% satisfaction with this type of teaching methodology. Implications for Practice: Implementation of high fidelity pediatric advanced life support simulations does improve student's knowledge and participation in the skills and testing stations of a PALS course. Students appear engaged in the new teaching methodology and seem excited to parcitipate in the skills and testing stations.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntegrating High Fidelity Simulation into a Regional PALS Course for Western North Carolinaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBraswell, Karenen_US
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Alesiaen_US
dc.author.detailsKaren Braswell, MSN, RN-BC, Mission Hospitals, Asheville, North Carolina, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Alesia Carpenter, MSN, APRN, BC, CS, CDE, Mission Hospitals AB Tech, Enka Campus, Candler, North Carolina, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164255-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine if high fidelity simulation would make a difference in learning and participation in a standardized pediatric advanced life support course for healthcare providers. Significance: High fidelity simulation has been used in medical, anesthesia and emergency medical education for several years. With the advent of the newly revised pediatric advanced life support guidelines for 2005, the question was posed: Would the development and implementation of high fidelity pediatric advanced life support simulations improve student's knowledge and participation in the skills and testing stations in an existing course? Design: Pediatric Life Support courses began in the 1990's with the American Heart Association. PALS classes have been taught at local training centers for about 15 years. The Regional Faculty/Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist at a southeastern trauma center reviewed the new guidelines after having been exposed to simulation and wondered if this new teaching methodology would benefit the course. Working collaboratively with the Regional Simulation Laboratory Coordinator, scenarios were developed for the new algorithms. These were trialed by a group of local healthcare experts and were implemented into the existing course in March 2007. Methods: Through a series of meetings, the Pediatric Clinical Nurse Specialist and the Regional Simulation Laboratory Coordinator developed 14 pediatric advanced life support scenarios based on the current guidelines. Findings: After trialing the 14 scenarios with a small group of healthcare providers, they were implemented into the PALS course in March 2007. Pre and post simulation surveys were administered to students. The results have indicated simulation is an effective teaching tool. Conclusions: Simulated scenarios are being used monthly in the PALS course for skills and testing stations. Data from 4 months indicated a greater than 50% satisfaction with this type of teaching methodology. Implications for Practice: Implementation of high fidelity pediatric advanced life support simulations does improve student's knowledge and participation in the skills and testing stations of a PALS course. Students appear engaged in the new teaching methodology and seem excited to parcitipate in the skills and testing stations.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:44:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:44:55Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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