2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164269
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Educating Oncology Nurses on Diabetes in the Oncology Population
Author(s):
Davis, Ellen D.; Houchin, Laura; Mabrey, Melanie
Author Details:
Ellen D. Davis, MS, RN, CDE, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Laura Houchin,MSN, OCNS; Melanie Mabrey, NP
Abstract:
Purpose: 1. Promote nursing education on increased incidence of diabetes among oncology patients and importance of glycemic control in hospitalized patients. 2. Enhance critical thinking skills for oncology staff in insulin therapy. 3. Decrease the number of adverse drug events (ADEs) related to insulin on inpatient oncology units. Significance: Sliding scale insulin therapy has been the treatment of choice for oncology patients. As evidence has grown on the benefits of tight glycemic control in the hospital setting, patients are on more appropriate and aggressive insulin regimens which can also lead to hypoglycemia. Design: Sliding scale insulin therapy has been the treatment of choice for oncology patients. As evidence has grown on the benefits of tight glycemic control in the hospital setting, patients are on more appropriate and aggressive insulin regimens which can also lead to hypoglycemia. Methods: We developed an educational approach to prompt oncology nurses to think past sliding scale insulin (a reactive, inferior method) and examine the impact of cancer and treatments on blood glucose control. In conjunction, we developed a series of "questions" for nurses to prompt critical thinking. Posters were displayed with information on insulin, the questions, and a reference to the hospital's standard for care for the patient with diabetes. We held classes on effects of steroids, nutrition, and insulin administration on glucose control. Laminated reminder cards of the questions were placed inside each patient's medication record. Findings: We saw a reduction in number and severity of ADEs. ADE's concerning hypoglycemia are triggered by the removal of each D50 from the medication system. Incidents of hypoglycemia that were treated and fell under the "preventable" category decreased. We validated nursing competency via electronic testing of a study guide. Once completed by nursing, a letter was placed in their personnel file. Conclusions: Nursing feedback was positive for this project. Further, we concluded that insulin ADEs can be reduced. Implications for Practice: Diabetes incidence is increasing, and many oncology patients are being influenced by their treatment for cancer and side effects. Yearly programs that promote greater understanding can lead to diminished problems with blood glucose control.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEducating Oncology Nurses on Diabetes in the Oncology Populationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Ellen D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHouchin, Lauraen_US
dc.contributor.authorMabrey, Melanieen_US
dc.author.detailsEllen D. Davis, MS, RN, CDE, Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Laura Houchin,MSN, OCNS; Melanie Mabrey, NPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164269-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: 1. Promote nursing education on increased incidence of diabetes among oncology patients and importance of glycemic control in hospitalized patients. 2. Enhance critical thinking skills for oncology staff in insulin therapy. 3. Decrease the number of adverse drug events (ADEs) related to insulin on inpatient oncology units. Significance: Sliding scale insulin therapy has been the treatment of choice for oncology patients. As evidence has grown on the benefits of tight glycemic control in the hospital setting, patients are on more appropriate and aggressive insulin regimens which can also lead to hypoglycemia. Design: Sliding scale insulin therapy has been the treatment of choice for oncology patients. As evidence has grown on the benefits of tight glycemic control in the hospital setting, patients are on more appropriate and aggressive insulin regimens which can also lead to hypoglycemia. Methods: We developed an educational approach to prompt oncology nurses to think past sliding scale insulin (a reactive, inferior method) and examine the impact of cancer and treatments on blood glucose control. In conjunction, we developed a series of "questions" for nurses to prompt critical thinking. Posters were displayed with information on insulin, the questions, and a reference to the hospital's standard for care for the patient with diabetes. We held classes on effects of steroids, nutrition, and insulin administration on glucose control. Laminated reminder cards of the questions were placed inside each patient's medication record. Findings: We saw a reduction in number and severity of ADEs. ADE's concerning hypoglycemia are triggered by the removal of each D50 from the medication system. Incidents of hypoglycemia that were treated and fell under the "preventable" category decreased. We validated nursing competency via electronic testing of a study guide. Once completed by nursing, a letter was placed in their personnel file. Conclusions: Nursing feedback was positive for this project. Further, we concluded that insulin ADEs can be reduced. Implications for Practice: Diabetes incidence is increasing, and many oncology patients are being influenced by their treatment for cancer and side effects. Yearly programs that promote greater understanding can lead to diminished problems with blood glucose control.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:12Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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