2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164270
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A New (Old?) Model for CNS Education: the CNS-Nurse Educator
Author(s):
Dennison, Robin
Author Details:
Robin Dennison, DNP, RN, CCNS, University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: Describe a new HRSA grant supported program for the role of clinical nurse specialist-nurse educator (CNS-NE). Significance: The US is in the midst of an unprecedented nursing shortage. An insufficient number of faculty was cited by 76.1% of responding schools as a reason for not accepting qualified applicants (American Academy of Colleges of Nursing, 2005). Concurrently, the supply of clinical nurse specialists does not meet regional and national demands. The recent Institute of Medicine publications (e.g., Crossing the Quality Chasm) emphasize the need to overhaul the US healthcare system and CNSs are uniquely qualified to serve as systems leaders. Design: The College of Nursing has been awarded 1 million dollars over 3 years for the development of an online program for a new role that combines the competencies of the CNS and nurse educator. Methods: The conceptual framework of this new MSN program is the synergy model and coursework will focus on development of a clinical specialty along with formal training in pedagogy. It is anticipated that the graduate of this program will serve as a CNS in a hospital and also serve as an adjunct clinical instructor for a local college or university. The nurse educator role may also be actualized as a staff development instructor or an academic faculty member. The curriculum has been planned to ease matriculation into the DNP program. Findings: The ultimate aim of the CNS-NE program is to increase the number and diversity of CNSs with nurse educator skills available for acute care settings and schools of nursing. This will improve clinical care as well as increase the capacity of nursing education programs. The CNS-NE program will combine the course requirements to qualify the graduate to take ANCC CNS certification as well as the course requirements for an NLN certificate in nursing education. Conclusions: This program is intended to aid in easing the shortage of both CNSs and nurse educators by expanding the formal education in pedagogy beyond what is usually included in most CNS programs. Implications for Practice: The planned curriculum and rationale will be shared and implications discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA New (Old?) Model for CNS Education: the CNS-Nurse Educatoren_GB
dc.contributor.authorDennison, Robinen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Dennison, DNP, RN, CCNS, University of Cincinnati College of Nursing, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164270-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Describe a new HRSA grant supported program for the role of clinical nurse specialist-nurse educator (CNS-NE). Significance: The US is in the midst of an unprecedented nursing shortage. An insufficient number of faculty was cited by 76.1% of responding schools as a reason for not accepting qualified applicants (American Academy of Colleges of Nursing, 2005). Concurrently, the supply of clinical nurse specialists does not meet regional and national demands. The recent Institute of Medicine publications (e.g., Crossing the Quality Chasm) emphasize the need to overhaul the US healthcare system and CNSs are uniquely qualified to serve as systems leaders. Design: The College of Nursing has been awarded 1 million dollars over 3 years for the development of an online program for a new role that combines the competencies of the CNS and nurse educator. Methods: The conceptual framework of this new MSN program is the synergy model and coursework will focus on development of a clinical specialty along with formal training in pedagogy. It is anticipated that the graduate of this program will serve as a CNS in a hospital and also serve as an adjunct clinical instructor for a local college or university. The nurse educator role may also be actualized as a staff development instructor or an academic faculty member. The curriculum has been planned to ease matriculation into the DNP program. Findings: The ultimate aim of the CNS-NE program is to increase the number and diversity of CNSs with nurse educator skills available for acute care settings and schools of nursing. This will improve clinical care as well as increase the capacity of nursing education programs. The CNS-NE program will combine the course requirements to qualify the graduate to take ANCC CNS certification as well as the course requirements for an NLN certificate in nursing education. Conclusions: This program is intended to aid in easing the shortage of both CNSs and nurse educators by expanding the formal education in pedagogy beyond what is usually included in most CNS programs. Implications for Practice: The planned curriculum and rationale will be shared and implications discussed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:13Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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