2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164273
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Coming Full Circle: Preparing the Next Generation of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Author(s):
Dubendorf, Phyllis
Author Details:
Phyllis Dubendorf, MSN, CRNP MSN, CRNP, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: To prepare Clinical Nurse Specialist with the tools to provide safe and competent care to patients and their families in the 21st century, an educational program was developed to focus on systems issues, evidenced based practice and developing interdisciplinary and collegueal relationships in order to create a culture of best practices. Significance: The pool of appropriately prepared advanced practice nurses to assume the role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) diminished after Schools of Nursing re-tooled their educational programs to meet market demands for Nurse Practitioners. Design: Over a decade ago, it was evident that in order to meet to market demand, education for the advanced practice nurse focused on preparing nurses for the role of the nurse practitioner (NP). As those prepared as nurse practitioners moved in to the workplace, it was equally evident that there was still a need for Clinical Nurse Specialists. However, few advanced practice nurses were equipped to function as CNSs. During this time, the role of the CNS evolved, forcing a change in the education curricula. The University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing responded to the need for the next generation of CNS preparation. Methods: This poster presents the steps taken by the University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing to develop a CNS educational program that meets the needs of the patients and the health delivery system of the 21st century. The curriculum addresses the unique contributions of CNSs to the delivery of care. The spheres of influence provide a framework around which the curriculum is constructed. Findings: The CNS curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania is offered in a multi-media, flexible scheduling model. Content is offered in class before and after the semester. During the semester, students respond to discussion boards, participate in and lead interactive chat room discussions. Structured clinical learning with expert clinical nurse specialists practicing within the student's clinical area of interest provides students with the opportunities to participate in actual role-based activities. Conclusions: Clinical Nurse Specialists are faced with a multitude of patient care and system issues and must be prepared appropriately to meet the needs of patients and their families. Educational programs must respond to meet the challenge by reformulating their curricula to provide appropriate strategies. Implications for Practice: Educators and nursing administrators must work together to identify the needs of advanced practice nurses to provide the necessary tools to meet the ever-changing needs of the health care system and the patients for whom we care.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComing Full Circle: Preparing the Next Generation of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDubendorf, Phyllisen_US
dc.author.detailsPhyllis Dubendorf, MSN, CRNP MSN, CRNP, University of Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164273-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To prepare Clinical Nurse Specialist with the tools to provide safe and competent care to patients and their families in the 21st century, an educational program was developed to focus on systems issues, evidenced based practice and developing interdisciplinary and collegueal relationships in order to create a culture of best practices. Significance: The pool of appropriately prepared advanced practice nurses to assume the role of the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) diminished after Schools of Nursing re-tooled their educational programs to meet market demands for Nurse Practitioners. Design: Over a decade ago, it was evident that in order to meet to market demand, education for the advanced practice nurse focused on preparing nurses for the role of the nurse practitioner (NP). As those prepared as nurse practitioners moved in to the workplace, it was equally evident that there was still a need for Clinical Nurse Specialists. However, few advanced practice nurses were equipped to function as CNSs. During this time, the role of the CNS evolved, forcing a change in the education curricula. The University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing responded to the need for the next generation of CNS preparation. Methods: This poster presents the steps taken by the University of Pennsylvania, School of Nursing to develop a CNS educational program that meets the needs of the patients and the health delivery system of the 21st century. The curriculum addresses the unique contributions of CNSs to the delivery of care. The spheres of influence provide a framework around which the curriculum is constructed. Findings: The CNS curriculum at the University of Pennsylvania is offered in a multi-media, flexible scheduling model. Content is offered in class before and after the semester. During the semester, students respond to discussion boards, participate in and lead interactive chat room discussions. Structured clinical learning with expert clinical nurse specialists practicing within the student's clinical area of interest provides students with the opportunities to participate in actual role-based activities. Conclusions: Clinical Nurse Specialists are faced with a multitude of patient care and system issues and must be prepared appropriately to meet the needs of patients and their families. Educational programs must respond to meet the challenge by reformulating their curricula to provide appropriate strategies. Implications for Practice: Educators and nursing administrators must work together to identify the needs of advanced practice nurses to provide the necessary tools to meet the ever-changing needs of the health care system and the patients for whom we care.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:16Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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