CNS Intern Program: A Creative Approach to Address Supply and Demand Inequities of Clinical Nurse Specialists

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164274
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
CNS Intern Program: A Creative Approach to Address Supply and Demand Inequities of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Author(s):
Dumpe, Michelle; Modic, Mary Beth
Author Details:
Michelle Dumpe, PhD, RN, The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Mary Beth Modic, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: This session will demonstrate the lessons learned from implementing a CNS Intern Program in a 1000 bed tertiary care center. Significance: Several open positions for Clinical Nurse Specialists remained unfilled after one year of intensive recruiting by the Department of Nurse Recruitment. Due to an increased demand by nurses entering graduate studies for Nurse Practitioner education and less demand for CNS education, many of the local universities and colleges no longer offered CNS programs or offered CNS/NP curriculum. The shift in graduate education demand resulted in a decrease supply of CNSs locally. Design: Concerns about the increase LOS and patient complexity coupled with the changes in the nurse employee profile prompted the Director of Nursing Education and Professional Practice Development to seek an innovative solution to fill the open positions. This position required that the applicants be accepted into a CNS program, attend graduate school full time, and commit to remain in the CNS role at the organization for four years after graduation. In return, the organization would assume the total cost of tuition and afford flexibility in both work schedule and productivity. Methods: A new position was created that permitted qualified candidates to function in the role of clinical instructor their first year in graduate school and CNS intern during their second year of the program. The role of CNS intern afforded the graduate students the opportunity to transfer skills they were learning in the classroom immediately into their clinical area. Additionally, the CNS interns were encouraged to select class projects that would also meet work expectations. Each CNS intern was assigned a CNS mentor who provided consultation and assisted with role modeling and problem solving. Findings: Five CNS Interns completed graduate school and are credentialed as CNSs. They all assumed the CNS role with confidence and have exceeded role expectations particularly in the areas of educator and consultant. 1 individual is completing her first year as a Clinical Instructor and will be transitioning to the role of CNS Intern. 1 CNS Intern resigned from the position. Five additional CNS Intern positions have been created and candidates are currently being interviewed for those positions. Conclusions: The CNS Intern program is an innovative program that fosters professional growth and development. It provides additional support to individuals who are attempting to balance work, school and family demands. It supplies the CNS Intern with the skills to immediately meet the challenge of providing care and consultation to patients with complex unpatternable care needs. Implications for Practice: The increase in chronic disease, uninsured and aging population coupled with the nursing shortage requires that nurses be educated at an advanced level to manage the ever increasing complexity, challenge the status quo and create processes that will provide safe, comprehensive and patient centered care. The CNS Intern program is one innovation that does just that.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCNS Intern Program: A Creative Approach to Address Supply and Demand Inequities of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDumpe, Michelleen_US
dc.contributor.authorModic, Mary Bethen_US
dc.author.detailsMichelle Dumpe, PhD, RN, The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Mary Beth Modic, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164274-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This session will demonstrate the lessons learned from implementing a CNS Intern Program in a 1000 bed tertiary care center. Significance: Several open positions for Clinical Nurse Specialists remained unfilled after one year of intensive recruiting by the Department of Nurse Recruitment. Due to an increased demand by nurses entering graduate studies for Nurse Practitioner education and less demand for CNS education, many of the local universities and colleges no longer offered CNS programs or offered CNS/NP curriculum. The shift in graduate education demand resulted in a decrease supply of CNSs locally. Design: Concerns about the increase LOS and patient complexity coupled with the changes in the nurse employee profile prompted the Director of Nursing Education and Professional Practice Development to seek an innovative solution to fill the open positions. This position required that the applicants be accepted into a CNS program, attend graduate school full time, and commit to remain in the CNS role at the organization for four years after graduation. In return, the organization would assume the total cost of tuition and afford flexibility in both work schedule and productivity. Methods: A new position was created that permitted qualified candidates to function in the role of clinical instructor their first year in graduate school and CNS intern during their second year of the program. The role of CNS intern afforded the graduate students the opportunity to transfer skills they were learning in the classroom immediately into their clinical area. Additionally, the CNS interns were encouraged to select class projects that would also meet work expectations. Each CNS intern was assigned a CNS mentor who provided consultation and assisted with role modeling and problem solving. Findings: Five CNS Interns completed graduate school and are credentialed as CNSs. They all assumed the CNS role with confidence and have exceeded role expectations particularly in the areas of educator and consultant. 1 individual is completing her first year as a Clinical Instructor and will be transitioning to the role of CNS Intern. 1 CNS Intern resigned from the position. Five additional CNS Intern positions have been created and candidates are currently being interviewed for those positions. Conclusions: The CNS Intern program is an innovative program that fosters professional growth and development. It provides additional support to individuals who are attempting to balance work, school and family demands. It supplies the CNS Intern with the skills to immediately meet the challenge of providing care and consultation to patients with complex unpatternable care needs. Implications for Practice: The increase in chronic disease, uninsured and aging population coupled with the nursing shortage requires that nurses be educated at an advanced level to manage the ever increasing complexity, challenge the status quo and create processes that will provide safe, comprehensive and patient centered care. The CNS Intern program is one innovation that does just that.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:18Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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