Evidence-Based Practice: The Role of the CNS in the Development of a Formal Evidence-Based Practice Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164286
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Evidence-Based Practice: The Role of the CNS in the Development of a Formal Evidence-Based Practice Program
Author(s):
Hubner, Kathleen; Storey, Susan
Author Details:
Kathleen Hubner, MSN, RN, CNRN, St. Vincent Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Susan Storey, MSN, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: To create a culture of questioning and provide nurses with knowledge and skills to search, critically appraise, and utilize the best evidence to optimize patient outcomes. 1. To articulate the Six A's of EBP. 2. To recognize the impact EBP can make on patient outcomes 3. To critically question nursing practice 4. To identify resources available to answer questions 5. To apply steps involved in the EBP process Significance: Studies have shown that Evidence Based Practice (EBP) improves outcomes by 28%; decreases costs by standardizing care and implementing protocols that result in better treatment of acute and chronic health conditions; and promotes critical thinking and autonomy in practice. Design: When nurses know how to ask questions, acquire and critically appraise the literature, apply it to practice, assess change and assimilate the information, optimal outcomes for all patients can be achieved. Methods: Prior to CNS involvement a gap in knowledge was identified by the QI team. CNSs became involved and defined that gap as a paucity of EBP. A task force of multidisciplinary stakeholders was developed. Findings: The CNSs created a simplified version of an existing EBP model - the Six A's - Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply, Assess, & Assimilate/Disseminate. A project plan was designed, objectives and content were defined for each of the Six A's and a syllabus was created. The curriculum involved didactic, interactive, computer training and self study time. Content was trialed using the task force members and feedback was integrated into current content. Conclusions: A two phase program consisting of basic information (Phase I) and an in depth internship program (Phase II) has been implemented. Implications for Practice: A culture of questioning is imperative for nurses to maintain skills and knowledge based on the best available evidence. Developing an engaging process for educating staff nurses can lead to increased knowledge, attitudes, skills and habits toward EBP. CNSs play an integral role in development, application and on-going evaluation of the program. It is through understanding EBP and its impact on patient outcomes that nurses are able to apply current evidence and sustain change in practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEvidence-Based Practice: The Role of the CNS in the Development of a Formal Evidence-Based Practice Programen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHubner, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorStorey, Susanen_US
dc.author.detailsKathleen Hubner, MSN, RN, CNRN, St. Vincent Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Susan Storey, MSN, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164286-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To create a culture of questioning and provide nurses with knowledge and skills to search, critically appraise, and utilize the best evidence to optimize patient outcomes. 1. To articulate the Six A's of EBP. 2. To recognize the impact EBP can make on patient outcomes 3. To critically question nursing practice 4. To identify resources available to answer questions 5. To apply steps involved in the EBP process Significance: Studies have shown that Evidence Based Practice (EBP) improves outcomes by 28%; decreases costs by standardizing care and implementing protocols that result in better treatment of acute and chronic health conditions; and promotes critical thinking and autonomy in practice. Design: When nurses know how to ask questions, acquire and critically appraise the literature, apply it to practice, assess change and assimilate the information, optimal outcomes for all patients can be achieved. Methods: Prior to CNS involvement a gap in knowledge was identified by the QI team. CNSs became involved and defined that gap as a paucity of EBP. A task force of multidisciplinary stakeholders was developed. Findings: The CNSs created a simplified version of an existing EBP model - the Six A's - Ask, Acquire, Appraise, Apply, Assess, & Assimilate/Disseminate. A project plan was designed, objectives and content were defined for each of the Six A's and a syllabus was created. The curriculum involved didactic, interactive, computer training and self study time. Content was trialed using the task force members and feedback was integrated into current content. Conclusions: A two phase program consisting of basic information (Phase I) and an in depth internship program (Phase II) has been implemented. Implications for Practice: A culture of questioning is imperative for nurses to maintain skills and knowledge based on the best available evidence. Developing an engaging process for educating staff nurses can lead to increased knowledge, attitudes, skills and habits toward EBP. CNSs play an integral role in development, application and on-going evaluation of the program. It is through understanding EBP and its impact on patient outcomes that nurses are able to apply current evidence and sustain change in practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:32Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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