2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164289
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Hourly Nursing Rounds; Shaping Nursing Culture to Achieve Nursing Quality Outcomes
Author(s):
Kalman, Melanie; Olrich, Todd; Nigolian, Cindy
Author Details:
Melanie Kalman, PhD, RN, SUNY Upstate Medical University School of Nursing, Syracuse, New York, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Todd Olrich, MSN, RN; Cindy Nigolian, MSN, RN, Crouse Hospital, Syracuse, New York, USA
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this replication study was to determine if hourly nursing rounds effect patient fall rates, patient satisfaction, and call light usage. Significance: Falls among hospitalized patients are a persistent problem with 2.3 to 7 falls occurring in U.S. hospitals every 1000 patient days. Approximately 30-48% of these falls result in injury, costing the hospital in excess of $4,200 per fall. Hospitalized patients often fall while performing elimination related activities. They ring the call light for assistance with these same activities. The call light can be a lifeline for hospitalized patients, but it can also impose considerable demands on nurses' time. Studies have documented the unfavorable effects of patients' frequent use of the call lights on the effectiveness of patient care management on in-patient units. Implementation of hourly rounding has shown positive outcomes in reducing falls and patient call light usage as well as increased satisfaction. The CNS, as principle investigator, initiated this study to advance clinical excellence. Design: Quasi-Experimental Methods: In this quasi-experimental, replication study, using two medical-surgical units, data was collected for patient falls, patient satisfaction, and call light usage prior to the implementation of nursing rounds. The same data was collected after implementation of rounds on the experimental unit. The sample consisted of all patients admitted to the units during the study period. All nursing personnel were educated on how to perform hourly rounds. Data will be analyzed using non-parametric and parametric statistics. Findings: Pending Conclusions: Pending Implications for Practice: Findings from this study will potentially be used to change nursing practice at the hospital and promote clinical excellence.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHourly Nursing Rounds; Shaping Nursing Culture to Achieve Nursing Quality Outcomesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKalman, Melanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorOlrich, Todden_US
dc.contributor.authorNigolian, Cindyen_US
dc.author.detailsMelanie Kalman, PhD, RN, SUNY Upstate Medical University School of Nursing, Syracuse, New York, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Todd Olrich, MSN, RN; Cindy Nigolian, MSN, RN, Crouse Hospital, Syracuse, New York, USAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164289-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this replication study was to determine if hourly nursing rounds effect patient fall rates, patient satisfaction, and call light usage. Significance: Falls among hospitalized patients are a persistent problem with 2.3 to 7 falls occurring in U.S. hospitals every 1000 patient days. Approximately 30-48% of these falls result in injury, costing the hospital in excess of $4,200 per fall. Hospitalized patients often fall while performing elimination related activities. They ring the call light for assistance with these same activities. The call light can be a lifeline for hospitalized patients, but it can also impose considerable demands on nurses' time. Studies have documented the unfavorable effects of patients' frequent use of the call lights on the effectiveness of patient care management on in-patient units. Implementation of hourly rounding has shown positive outcomes in reducing falls and patient call light usage as well as increased satisfaction. The CNS, as principle investigator, initiated this study to advance clinical excellence. Design: Quasi-Experimental Methods: In this quasi-experimental, replication study, using two medical-surgical units, data was collected for patient falls, patient satisfaction, and call light usage prior to the implementation of nursing rounds. The same data was collected after implementation of rounds on the experimental unit. The sample consisted of all patients admitted to the units during the study period. All nursing personnel were educated on how to perform hourly rounds. Data will be analyzed using non-parametric and parametric statistics. Findings: Pending Conclusions: Pending Implications for Practice: Findings from this study will potentially be used to change nursing practice at the hospital and promote clinical excellence.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:36Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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