2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164293
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validating Learning Using Behavorial Rehearsal
Author(s):
Modic, Mary Beth
Author Details:
Mary Beth Modic, MSN, RN, The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: This session will examine the concept of behavioral rehearsal in evaluating learning at the conclusion of diabetes management in-services. Significance: Determining the degree of learning that results from participation in an educational session has always provided a challenge to the CNS. Course evaluations often concentrate on measuring the degree that the participant believes an objective has been met using a rank ordering system. Other course evaluations request that the participant enumerate ways that clinical practice will change as a result of attending the individual program. Some CNSs combine a variety of strategies to assess learning such as pre/post tests, return demonstrations, or games. Unfortunately, these methods often fall short in identifying serious gaps of critical concepts. Design: Behavioral rehearsal has its origins in the psychology literature, most notably, in the area of social skill deficits. Marlene Kramer also used the term in her work with "reality shock" and new graduate nurses. Kramer's supposition was that new graduates would learn from the mistakes of others by listening to the stories of their peers in support groups. By critiquing situations, which resulted in an error or conflict, new nurses were able to socially "practice the correct action." Given the fast paced work environment, nurses must learn subtle nuances of decision making through behavioral rehearsal in the "classroom". The intent of behavioral rehearsal is to challenge the learner to a deeper understanding of key concepts. Methods: At the conclusion of each diabetes management session, the CNS requires the learner to decide upon a course of action to a perplexing situation. Verbal responses to the situations are solicited, debated and discussed. This methodology allows participants to grasp new concepts in a memorable way Findings: Behavioral rehearsal is an engaging approach. It uncovers the discrepancies in surface knowledge from that of mastery. It is an easy and time effective diagnostic tool learners can use for self- assessment. In addition, it provides immediate feedback about the rationale for decision-making. Nurses have verbalized this technique as "unsettling" but tremendously valuable in identifying their gaps in knowledge. Conclusions: Clinical Nurse Specialists are adroit at presenting intricate content and unraveling complex concepts. CNSs skillfully apply the insights and unique perspectives to challenging patient situations. However, CNSs must balance their role of clinical expert Implications for Practice: Time has become the most valued commodity in health care. When time is allotted for in-services, orientation or continuing education courses, the CNS must craft with great care how time is spent. No longer is it acceptable to overload the learner with content, equal time must be spent on the validation of learning.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidating Learning Using Behavorial Rehearsalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorModic, Mary Bethen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Beth Modic, MSN, RN, The Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164293-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This session will examine the concept of behavioral rehearsal in evaluating learning at the conclusion of diabetes management in-services. Significance: Determining the degree of learning that results from participation in an educational session has always provided a challenge to the CNS. Course evaluations often concentrate on measuring the degree that the participant believes an objective has been met using a rank ordering system. Other course evaluations request that the participant enumerate ways that clinical practice will change as a result of attending the individual program. Some CNSs combine a variety of strategies to assess learning such as pre/post tests, return demonstrations, or games. Unfortunately, these methods often fall short in identifying serious gaps of critical concepts. Design: Behavioral rehearsal has its origins in the psychology literature, most notably, in the area of social skill deficits. Marlene Kramer also used the term in her work with "reality shock" and new graduate nurses. Kramer's supposition was that new graduates would learn from the mistakes of others by listening to the stories of their peers in support groups. By critiquing situations, which resulted in an error or conflict, new nurses were able to socially "practice the correct action." Given the fast paced work environment, nurses must learn subtle nuances of decision making through behavioral rehearsal in the "classroom". The intent of behavioral rehearsal is to challenge the learner to a deeper understanding of key concepts. Methods: At the conclusion of each diabetes management session, the CNS requires the learner to decide upon a course of action to a perplexing situation. Verbal responses to the situations are solicited, debated and discussed. This methodology allows participants to grasp new concepts in a memorable way Findings: Behavioral rehearsal is an engaging approach. It uncovers the discrepancies in surface knowledge from that of mastery. It is an easy and time effective diagnostic tool learners can use for self- assessment. In addition, it provides immediate feedback about the rationale for decision-making. Nurses have verbalized this technique as "unsettling" but tremendously valuable in identifying their gaps in knowledge. Conclusions: Clinical Nurse Specialists are adroit at presenting intricate content and unraveling complex concepts. CNSs skillfully apply the insights and unique perspectives to challenging patient situations. However, CNSs must balance their role of clinical expert Implications for Practice: Time has become the most valued commodity in health care. When time is allotted for in-services, orientation or continuing education courses, the CNS must craft with great care how time is spent. No longer is it acceptable to overload the learner with content, equal time must be spent on the validation of learning.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:41Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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