2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164297
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Deploying A Rapid Response Team from Start to Finish: A New CNSs Perspective
Author(s):
Polster, Debra
Author Details:
Debra Polster, MS, RN, CCRN, CNS, St. Margaret Mercy Hospital, Hammond, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this presentation is to provide a framework for a new CNS implementing a Rapid Response Team (RRT) in a small, non-for profit community hospital setting. The presentation will list the process of initial program development, implementation and evaluation. New CNS challenges will be analyzed. Significance: Evidence shows the RRT improves patient outcomes outside the ICU. The critical process of program development and barrier identification will be described. The essential steps taken for collaboration and resource utilization that were vital in RRT program development will be reviewed. Design: The RRT is a plan defined by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement in an effort to make healthcare safer and more effective by intervening at the first sign of patient decline. Evidence shows that the institution of a RRT decreases the number of cardiac and respiratory arrests outside the ICU as well as reduces ICU admissions by early recognition and treatment. Methods: The new CNS identified key stakeholders to assist in ensuring hospital-wide acceptance and support of the RRT. After a committee was developed, a successful pilot was implemented. Hospital-wide deployment was then planned. Extensive education was given to all patient care providers that included the criteria to call the RRT, the roles and responsibilities of each care giver, and goals. Evaluation tools were constructed to evaluate the effectiveness of the RRT. Findings: A pilot phase was successful and the RRT deployed hospital-wide February 2007. On average, the team received a call every other day. Patient signs and symptoms that prompted the RRT call will be presented with respective interventions used. Quality assurance data demonstrated that hospital and ICU length of stay decreased as well as mortality rate since deployment. The participants were overwhelmingly satisfied according to the evaluations collected. The positive impact of the RRT deployment by the new CNS will be presented. Implications for Practice: The RRT process improves provider knowledge and encourages autonomy. The unending practice of program evaluation is reinforced. Finally, by identifying the challenges a new CNS must overcome, the RRT program can deploy successfully.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeploying A Rapid Response Team from Start to Finish: A New CNSs Perspectiveen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPolster, Debraen_US
dc.author.detailsDebra Polster, MS, RN, CCRN, CNS, St. Margaret Mercy Hospital, Hammond, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164297-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this presentation is to provide a framework for a new CNS implementing a Rapid Response Team (RRT) in a small, non-for profit community hospital setting. The presentation will list the process of initial program development, implementation and evaluation. New CNS challenges will be analyzed. Significance: Evidence shows the RRT improves patient outcomes outside the ICU. The critical process of program development and barrier identification will be described. The essential steps taken for collaboration and resource utilization that were vital in RRT program development will be reviewed. Design: The RRT is a plan defined by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement in an effort to make healthcare safer and more effective by intervening at the first sign of patient decline. Evidence shows that the institution of a RRT decreases the number of cardiac and respiratory arrests outside the ICU as well as reduces ICU admissions by early recognition and treatment. Methods: The new CNS identified key stakeholders to assist in ensuring hospital-wide acceptance and support of the RRT. After a committee was developed, a successful pilot was implemented. Hospital-wide deployment was then planned. Extensive education was given to all patient care providers that included the criteria to call the RRT, the roles and responsibilities of each care giver, and goals. Evaluation tools were constructed to evaluate the effectiveness of the RRT. Findings: A pilot phase was successful and the RRT deployed hospital-wide February 2007. On average, the team received a call every other day. Patient signs and symptoms that prompted the RRT call will be presented with respective interventions used. Quality assurance data demonstrated that hospital and ICU length of stay decreased as well as mortality rate since deployment. The participants were overwhelmingly satisfied according to the evaluations collected. The positive impact of the RRT deployment by the new CNS will be presented. Implications for Practice: The RRT process improves provider knowledge and encourages autonomy. The unending practice of program evaluation is reinforced. Finally, by identifying the challenges a new CNS must overcome, the RRT program can deploy successfully.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:46Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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