When the Spheres Align: The Role of the CNS in the Evaluation of Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164298
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
When the Spheres Align: The Role of the CNS in the Evaluation of Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections
Author(s):
Salamon, Lisa
Author Details:
Lisa Salamon, MSN, APRN BC, WOCN, Aurora Healthcare, St. Luke Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe a project which began as a quest to gather baseline data for a nurse sensitive indicator and evolved to a project that not only achieved its original objective but also demonstrates the role of the CNS in each of the spheres of influence. Significance: Urinary Tract Infections account for approximately 80% of healthcare-associated infections (HAI). To meet the requirement for medical necessity, patients are admitted to our rehabilitation program earlier in their hospital stay. As a result, we have seen an increase in the use of urinary catheters prompting us to look at device infection rates. Design: The goal of this collaborative project between nursing and infection control was to obtain baseline data on Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs) in a non-ICU inpatient setting. It was identified that a CNS colleague in the ICU's was facilitating a similar project. Combining these projects brought members from infection control, central services, purchasing, and the emergency department to the table to evaluate the potential impact on practice. This small unit specific project quickly grew into a project with implications for nursing practice well beyond our 45-bed nursing unit. Methods: Part one: Baseline data was collected from two inpatient rehabilitation units and two ICU's. A denominator data collection sheet was generated and faxed daily to the Infection Control Department. Concurrently, Information Services generated a surveillance report. The information was linked to determine infection rates. Part two: The workgroup with members from both projects, infection control, central services, purchasing, and the emergency department began to look at current practice, product evaluation, and education. Findings: Part One: initial data collection on CAUTIs is complete. Evaluation of data is in process. Part two: education modules reviewing insertion of indwelling catheters and the care of patients with indwelling catheters have been developed. Evaluation of a catheter securement device has occurred and a product conversion is in process. An audit tool has been developed for ongoing evaluation of the impact of this project. Conclusions: Implementation of this project is anticipated to decrease CAUTIs Implications for Practice: Improvement of patient care as well as support of the conceptual model of CNS practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWhen the Spheres Align: The Role of the CNS in the Evaluation of Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infectionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSalamon, Lisaen_US
dc.author.detailsLisa Salamon, MSN, APRN BC, WOCN, Aurora Healthcare, St. Luke Medical Center, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164298-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe a project which began as a quest to gather baseline data for a nurse sensitive indicator and evolved to a project that not only achieved its original objective but also demonstrates the role of the CNS in each of the spheres of influence. Significance: Urinary Tract Infections account for approximately 80% of healthcare-associated infections (HAI). To meet the requirement for medical necessity, patients are admitted to our rehabilitation program earlier in their hospital stay. As a result, we have seen an increase in the use of urinary catheters prompting us to look at device infection rates. Design: The goal of this collaborative project between nursing and infection control was to obtain baseline data on Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections (CAUTIs) in a non-ICU inpatient setting. It was identified that a CNS colleague in the ICU's was facilitating a similar project. Combining these projects brought members from infection control, central services, purchasing, and the emergency department to the table to evaluate the potential impact on practice. This small unit specific project quickly grew into a project with implications for nursing practice well beyond our 45-bed nursing unit. Methods: Part one: Baseline data was collected from two inpatient rehabilitation units and two ICU's. A denominator data collection sheet was generated and faxed daily to the Infection Control Department. Concurrently, Information Services generated a surveillance report. The information was linked to determine infection rates. Part two: The workgroup with members from both projects, infection control, central services, purchasing, and the emergency department began to look at current practice, product evaluation, and education. Findings: Part One: initial data collection on CAUTIs is complete. Evaluation of data is in process. Part two: education modules reviewing insertion of indwelling catheters and the care of patients with indwelling catheters have been developed. Evaluation of a catheter securement device has occurred and a product conversion is in process. An audit tool has been developed for ongoing evaluation of the impact of this project. Conclusions: Implementation of this project is anticipated to decrease CAUTIs Implications for Practice: Improvement of patient care as well as support of the conceptual model of CNS practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:47Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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