2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164302
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Equipment as Designed: Leading Staff to Safer Patient Care Practices
Author(s):
Thomas, Linda; Zuzelo, Patti
Author Details:
Linda Thomas, MSN, RN, CCRN, Albert Einstein Healthcare Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Patti Zuzelo EdD, APRN-BC, CNS
Abstract:
Purpose: The overall purpose of this study was to describe the influence of technologies on RN practice and the characteristics of technologies that encourage or hinder correct use. One objective was to identify how devices are being currently used by staff and the ways that usage deviates from manufacturer recommendations. A second objective was to use the descriptive data to better inform CNS practice within the nursing/nursing practice and organizations/systems spheres of influence. Significance: Safe use of available equipment requires consistent and sustained education and re-evaluation. Nurses often do not realize that they are using equipment contrary to recommended or required procedures. Patient safety may be compromised. Design: The qualitative study was descriptive and used group interviews. Methods: Four focus groups were conducted with experienced nurses (N = 31) employed on medical-surgical, telemetry, and long-term care units. Group interviews were audiotape recorded. Flip charts were used to record data during discussions and were used to inform data analysis. Data were thematically analyzed using line-by-line coding with clustering of sub-themes and themes. Findings: Participants identified that equipment does improve patient care outcomes and enhances nursing care delivery by reducing time and increasing productivity. Nurses were concerned about discrepancies between actual procedures versus recommended or required procedures. Participants described strategies used to bypass equipment difficulties, including lack of available parts and supplies. Nurses recognized that they often did not know the correct way to use available equipment. They learned informally using a "see one, do one" approach that was inconsistent and often incorrect. Participants noted that re-evaluation and re-education were lacking after equipment was initially introduced. Conclusions: Clinicians and administrators purchase equipment to reduce staff workload and to improve patient care efficiencies; however, inadequate attention is paid to designing improvement processes that ensure consistency, assess misinformation, and address gaps in education that may affect patient safety. Implications for Practice: CNSs need to development systems for standardizing orientation and educational programming to improve consistency in equipment usage. CNSs should design continuous quality improvement initiatives to address patient safety within the context of equipment use.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2008
Conference Name:
Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Atlanta, Georgia, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgia
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Equipment as Designed: Leading Staff to Safer Patient Care Practicesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.authorZuzelo, Pattien_US
dc.author.detailsLinda Thomas, MSN, RN, CCRN, Albert Einstein Healthcare Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Patti Zuzelo EdD, APRN-BC, CNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164302-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The overall purpose of this study was to describe the influence of technologies on RN practice and the characteristics of technologies that encourage or hinder correct use. One objective was to identify how devices are being currently used by staff and the ways that usage deviates from manufacturer recommendations. A second objective was to use the descriptive data to better inform CNS practice within the nursing/nursing practice and organizations/systems spheres of influence. Significance: Safe use of available equipment requires consistent and sustained education and re-evaluation. Nurses often do not realize that they are using equipment contrary to recommended or required procedures. Patient safety may be compromised. Design: The qualitative study was descriptive and used group interviews. Methods: Four focus groups were conducted with experienced nurses (N = 31) employed on medical-surgical, telemetry, and long-term care units. Group interviews were audiotape recorded. Flip charts were used to record data during discussions and were used to inform data analysis. Data were thematically analyzed using line-by-line coding with clustering of sub-themes and themes. Findings: Participants identified that equipment does improve patient care outcomes and enhances nursing care delivery by reducing time and increasing productivity. Nurses were concerned about discrepancies between actual procedures versus recommended or required procedures. Participants described strategies used to bypass equipment difficulties, including lack of available parts and supplies. Nurses recognized that they often did not know the correct way to use available equipment. They learned informally using a "see one, do one" approach that was inconsistent and often incorrect. Participants noted that re-evaluation and re-education were lacking after equipment was initially introduced. Conclusions: Clinicians and administrators purchase equipment to reduce staff workload and to improve patient care efficiencies; however, inadequate attention is paid to designing improvement processes that ensure consistency, assess misinformation, and address gaps in education that may affect patient safety. Implications for Practice: CNSs need to development systems for standardizing orientation and educational programming to improve consistency in equipment usage. CNSs should design continuous quality improvement initiatives to address patient safety within the context of equipment use.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:51Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:51Z-
dc.conference.date2008en_US
dc.conference.nameClinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellenceen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationAtlanta, Georgia, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Clinical Nurse Specialists: Leaders in Clinical Excellence, held March 5 - 8 at the Westin Peachtree Plaza in Atlanta, Georgiaen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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