An Analysis of Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic and Neurosurgical Surgeries

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164305
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An Analysis of Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic and Neurosurgical Surgeries
Author(s):
Barker, Robin; Eldredge, Deborah; Hurford, Suzanne
Author Details:
Robin Barker, MS, BSN, RN, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Deborah Eldredge; Suzanne Hurford
Abstract:
Purpose: This project was conducted to determine how well the risk factors described in the Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Bundle proposed by the "100K Lives Campaign" predicted infections in our patients undergoing hip, knee, or spinal fusion surgery. Significance: SSI is the most common nosocomial infection in surgery patients. Patients who develop SSI have increased health costs and are at greater risk for readmission or death. Design/Background/Rationale: Retrospective case control, quality improvement project to examine the risk factors contributing to SSI in our population. Methods/Description: All adults who developed SSI following knee/hip replacement or spinal fusion surgery between January 2002 and June 2004 (N = 88) comprised the infected group. Non-infected controls were matched 2:1 on gender, type of surgery, and age (N = 176). Univariate analyses were conducted to determine whether predictors were different by infection status. Significant individual predictors were entered into a logistic regression equation to determine their combined and relative contribution in SSI development. Findings/Outcomes: The significant individual risk factors for developing surgical site infections in this project were NNIS risk index, ASA score, and duration of surgery, controlling for all variables in the equation. Other elements of the IHI bundle, including hair removal technique, skin preparation, timing of antibiotic prophylaxis, wound class, and use of hardware, were not predictive of infection status. Conclusions: NNIS and ASA scores predicted infection. Identifying patients at risk for infection prior to surgery and providing additional management may help reduce infection rates.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn Analysis of Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections in Patients Undergoing Orthopedic and Neurosurgical Surgeriesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarker, Robinen_US
dc.contributor.authorEldredge, Deborahen_US
dc.contributor.authorHurford, Suzanneen_US
dc.author.detailsRobin Barker, MS, BSN, RN, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Deborah Eldredge; Suzanne Hurforden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164305-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This project was conducted to determine how well the risk factors described in the Surgical Site Infection (SSI) Bundle proposed by the "100K Lives Campaign" predicted infections in our patients undergoing hip, knee, or spinal fusion surgery. Significance: SSI is the most common nosocomial infection in surgery patients. Patients who develop SSI have increased health costs and are at greater risk for readmission or death. Design/Background/Rationale: Retrospective case control, quality improvement project to examine the risk factors contributing to SSI in our population. Methods/Description: All adults who developed SSI following knee/hip replacement or spinal fusion surgery between January 2002 and June 2004 (N = 88) comprised the infected group. Non-infected controls were matched 2:1 on gender, type of surgery, and age (N = 176). Univariate analyses were conducted to determine whether predictors were different by infection status. Significant individual predictors were entered into a logistic regression equation to determine their combined and relative contribution in SSI development. Findings/Outcomes: The significant individual risk factors for developing surgical site infections in this project were NNIS risk index, ASA score, and duration of surgery, controlling for all variables in the equation. Other elements of the IHI bundle, including hair removal technique, skin preparation, timing of antibiotic prophylaxis, wound class, and use of hardware, were not predictive of infection status. Conclusions: NNIS and ASA scores predicted infection. Identifying patients at risk for infection prior to surgery and providing additional management may help reduce infection rates.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:45:55Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:45:55Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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