2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164317
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Safe Management of Aggressive Patients or Families in Non-behavioral Health Settings
Author(s):
Cartney, Glenda; Sabo, Julie
Author Details:
Glenda Cartney, ACM, CCRN, United Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Julie Sabo, MN, RN, CCRN, APRN, BC
Abstract:
Purpose: This session will review significance and impact on nurses of working with aggressive patients and/or families. Potential strategies will be explored to assess patients and families at risk for developing aggressive behavior and to implement a program to decrease the number of episodes and injury to staff. Significance: An increase in the number of injuries to bedside staff nurses on non-behavioral health units (BHU) by aggressive patients prompted an examination of the process used to assess for potential aggressive or abusive behavior. Design/Background/Rationale: A CV CNS was asked to lead a task force to review our processes, revise our practices, and implement a program to reduce the potential for injury to staff related to behavioral health crises. Methods/Description: Upon completion of the task force's work, a system was implemented that included: 1. Screening of all patients for the risk of aggressive or abusive behavior, 2. A plan of care to be implemented for at risk patients/families, 3. A revision of the behavioral crisis management policy, 4. A process and tool to evaluate all behavioral crisis situations on a routine basis, and 5. An education plan to implement the above housewide and to train nursing staff on personal safety measures. Findings/Outcomes: Ninety-five percent of all nursing staff attended a 4-hour class, performing an assessment to determine a patient's risk of developing aggressive behavior and to learn de-escalation and personal safety techniques. A corresponding decrease in the number of restraint personnel and increased knowledge of staff was seen. Conclusions: A multidisciplinary approach resulted in a supportive process for staff to care for patients or families with aggressive behavior.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSafe Management of Aggressive Patients or Families in Non-behavioral Health Settingsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCartney, Glendaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSabo, Julieen_US
dc.author.detailsGlenda Cartney, ACM, CCRN, United Hospital, St. Paul, Minnesota, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Julie Sabo, MN, RN, CCRN, APRN, BCen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164317-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This session will review significance and impact on nurses of working with aggressive patients and/or families. Potential strategies will be explored to assess patients and families at risk for developing aggressive behavior and to implement a program to decrease the number of episodes and injury to staff. Significance: An increase in the number of injuries to bedside staff nurses on non-behavioral health units (BHU) by aggressive patients prompted an examination of the process used to assess for potential aggressive or abusive behavior. Design/Background/Rationale: A CV CNS was asked to lead a task force to review our processes, revise our practices, and implement a program to reduce the potential for injury to staff related to behavioral health crises. Methods/Description: Upon completion of the task force's work, a system was implemented that included: 1. Screening of all patients for the risk of aggressive or abusive behavior, 2. A plan of care to be implemented for at risk patients/families, 3. A revision of the behavioral crisis management policy, 4. A process and tool to evaluate all behavioral crisis situations on a routine basis, and 5. An education plan to implement the above housewide and to train nursing staff on personal safety measures. Findings/Outcomes: Ninety-five percent of all nursing staff attended a 4-hour class, performing an assessment to determine a patient's risk of developing aggressive behavior and to learn de-escalation and personal safety techniques. A corresponding decrease in the number of restraint personnel and increased knowledge of staff was seen. Conclusions: A multidisciplinary approach resulted in a supportive process for staff to care for patients or families with aggressive behavior.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:08Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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