2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164320
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Protecting the Patient in Crisis: The Role of the Rapid Response Team
Author(s):
Cleek, Carol F.
Author Details:
Carol F. Cleek, MSN, RN, APRN, BC, CCNS, The University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, Kansas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org
Abstract:
Purpose: The University of Kansas Hospital sought to decrease unwitnessed cardiac arrests and their attendant mortality by implementing a Rapid Response Team (RRT) to intervene earlier in the course of a patient's declining clinical status. We will describe our experience and outcomes with initiating an RRT in a rapid cycle project plan in under 6 weeks. Significance: Based on significant research and information received from other institutions and the IHI, this single intervention, as outlined in the 100,000 Lives Campaign, could significantly improve the failure rate in rescuing our sickest patients. Design/Background/Rationale: A number of recent reports from hospitals demonstrate a significant reduction in mortality through the implementation of a Rapid Response Team. These include the University of Pittsburgh, Baptist Memorial in Memphis, and throughout Australia. Also, numerous studies have demonstrated that more than half of all patients who experience a cardiac arrest have preceding dramatic aberrations in vital signs in the 6-8 hours before an arrest - most common on the acute care floors where nurse-patient ratios are higher and resources are more scarce. Methods/Description: An RRT committee, led by a CCNS and consisting of critical care medical and surgical physicians, hospitalists, critical care nurses, and respiratory therapists, developed guidelines for triggering a rapid response event. These triggers aim to focus the clinical bedside ward staff to identify patients in crisis. A team comprised of a tenured critical care nurse and respiratory therapist respond to any request for assistance - regardless of location or need. Simultaneously, the on-call resident and the patient's attending physician are notified and engaged in the process. The patient and their nurse are provided with immediate consultative care from other nurses and therapists to assist with supporting the patient's needs. Findings/Outcomes: In the first 6 months, we have demonstrated an overall reduction in crude hospital mortality by 11%, which would translate into 100 lives saved annually. The survival rate for RRT patients to discharge is 80% versus 17% for patients who experience a full cardiac arrest. Interestingly, patients that experience a RRT event and go on to experience a full cardiac arrest have a 67% survival to discharge rate. The RRT has been deployed to all areas of the hospital including the lobby and parking garage. The majority of patients go on to move to a higher level of care (80%) in either telemetry or critical care units. Conclusions: Development of a systematic way to identify patients in crisis, to deploy early and rapid resources to meet patient care needs, and to deliver timely, effective care improves the outcomes of our patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleProtecting the Patient in Crisis: The Role of the Rapid Response Teamen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCleek, Carol F.en_US
dc.author.detailsCarol F. Cleek, MSN, RN, APRN, BC, CCNS, The University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, Kansas, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164320-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The University of Kansas Hospital sought to decrease unwitnessed cardiac arrests and their attendant mortality by implementing a Rapid Response Team (RRT) to intervene earlier in the course of a patient's declining clinical status. We will describe our experience and outcomes with initiating an RRT in a rapid cycle project plan in under 6 weeks. Significance: Based on significant research and information received from other institutions and the IHI, this single intervention, as outlined in the 100,000 Lives Campaign, could significantly improve the failure rate in rescuing our sickest patients. Design/Background/Rationale: A number of recent reports from hospitals demonstrate a significant reduction in mortality through the implementation of a Rapid Response Team. These include the University of Pittsburgh, Baptist Memorial in Memphis, and throughout Australia. Also, numerous studies have demonstrated that more than half of all patients who experience a cardiac arrest have preceding dramatic aberrations in vital signs in the 6-8 hours before an arrest - most common on the acute care floors where nurse-patient ratios are higher and resources are more scarce. Methods/Description: An RRT committee, led by a CCNS and consisting of critical care medical and surgical physicians, hospitalists, critical care nurses, and respiratory therapists, developed guidelines for triggering a rapid response event. These triggers aim to focus the clinical bedside ward staff to identify patients in crisis. A team comprised of a tenured critical care nurse and respiratory therapist respond to any request for assistance - regardless of location or need. Simultaneously, the on-call resident and the patient's attending physician are notified and engaged in the process. The patient and their nurse are provided with immediate consultative care from other nurses and therapists to assist with supporting the patient's needs. Findings/Outcomes: In the first 6 months, we have demonstrated an overall reduction in crude hospital mortality by 11%, which would translate into 100 lives saved annually. The survival rate for RRT patients to discharge is 80% versus 17% for patients who experience a full cardiac arrest. Interestingly, patients that experience a RRT event and go on to experience a full cardiac arrest have a 67% survival to discharge rate. The RRT has been deployed to all areas of the hospital including the lobby and parking garage. The majority of patients go on to move to a higher level of care (80%) in either telemetry or critical care units. Conclusions: Development of a systematic way to identify patients in crisis, to deploy early and rapid resources to meet patient care needs, and to deliver timely, effective care improves the outcomes of our patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:12Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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