2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/164326
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Concurrent Data Collection for Heart Failure Core Measures
Author(s):
Ducre, Candace N.; Waggoner, Robin D.
Author Details:
Candace N. Ducre, MSN, MS, RN, CNS, Clarian Health Partners, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Robin D. Waggoner, MSN, RN, CNS
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine a process by which to identify heart failure (HF) core measures concurrently and to influence hospital outcomes in relation to heart failure. Significance: Quality indicators for HF are known as core measures. These measures guide hospitals to identify areas for clinical improvement and maximize reimbursement. While the majority of hospitals are collecting and submitting data for heart failure core measures, few have developed methods other than retrospective review that may require up to 3 months to collect and analyze data for submission. Retrospective chart review is often cumbersome and inefficient. Concurrent data collection for HF core measures allows hospitals to monitor their performance and institute any changes that would enhance clinical outcomes. Design/Background/Rationale: Clinical quality indicators for HF are being monitored and compared to national benchmarks by Joint Commission (JCAHO) in order to document performance of evidence-based medicine. Methods/Description: A large tertiary hospital has developed a methodology for identifying the patients admitted with HF and has designed a process for concurrent rounding for data collection. After initiating the pilot process, 75% of the patients who were discharged with primary diagnosis of HF were identified and evaluated by concurrent data collection. Findings/Outcomes: Furthermore, the results of the core measures improved significantly with this "real time approach." There was a significant improvement for HF core measures: discharge instructions, weight management, diet, activity, medications, and signs and symptoms. Also, smoking assessment and counseling for cessation increased by 24%. Conclusions: In addition to this improvement, the method proved to be more efficient and cost effective as less time was required for retrospective chart review and more current data was available to analyze.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights
Conference Host:
NACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists
Conference Location:
Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Description:
Conference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleConcurrent Data Collection for Heart Failure Core Measuresen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDucre, Candace N.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWaggoner, Robin D.en_US
dc.author.detailsCandace N. Ducre, MSN, MS, RN, CNS, Clarian Health Partners, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, email: nacnsorg@nacns.org; Robin D. Waggoner, MSN, RN, CNSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/164326-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine a process by which to identify heart failure (HF) core measures concurrently and to influence hospital outcomes in relation to heart failure. Significance: Quality indicators for HF are known as core measures. These measures guide hospitals to identify areas for clinical improvement and maximize reimbursement. While the majority of hospitals are collecting and submitting data for heart failure core measures, few have developed methods other than retrospective review that may require up to 3 months to collect and analyze data for submission. Retrospective chart review is often cumbersome and inefficient. Concurrent data collection for HF core measures allows hospitals to monitor their performance and institute any changes that would enhance clinical outcomes. Design/Background/Rationale: Clinical quality indicators for HF are being monitored and compared to national benchmarks by Joint Commission (JCAHO) in order to document performance of evidence-based medicine. Methods/Description: A large tertiary hospital has developed a methodology for identifying the patients admitted with HF and has designed a process for concurrent rounding for data collection. After initiating the pilot process, 75% of the patients who were discharged with primary diagnosis of HF were identified and evaluated by concurrent data collection. Findings/Outcomes: Furthermore, the results of the core measures improved significantly with this "real time approach." There was a significant improvement for HF core measures: discharge instructions, weight management, diet, activity, medications, and signs and symptoms. Also, smoking assessment and counseling for cessation increased by 24%. Conclusions: In addition to this improvement, the method proved to be more efficient and cost effective as less time was required for retrospective chart review and more current data was available to analyze.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:46:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:46:19Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.nameCNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heightsen_US
dc.conference.hostNACNS - National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialistsen_US
dc.conference.locationSalt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: CNS Leadership: Soaring to New Heights, held March 15-18, 2006 in Salt Lake City, Utah, USAen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.en_US
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